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Physical isolation with virtual support: Registrars’ learning via remote supervision

Overview of attention for article published in Medical Teacher, August 2014
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Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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9 Dimensions

Readers on

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32 Mendeley
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Title
Physical isolation with virtual support: Registrars’ learning via remote supervision
Published in
Medical Teacher, August 2014
DOI 10.3109/0142159x.2014.947941
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan M. Wearne, Pim W. Teunissen, Tim Dornan, Timothy Skinner

Abstract

Abstract Purpose: Changing the current geographical maldistribution of the medical workforce is important for global health. Research regarding programs that train doctors for work with disadvantaged, rural populations is needed. This paper explores one approach of remote supervision of registrars in isolated rural practice. Researching how learning occurs without on-site supervision may also reveal other key elements of postgraduate education. Methods: Thematic analysis of in-depth interviews exploring 11 respondents' experiences of learning via remote supervision. Results: Remote supervision created distinctive learning environments. Respondents' attributes interacted with external supports to influence whether and how their learning was promoted or impeded. Registrars with clinical and/or life experience, who were insightful and motivated to direct their learning, turned the challenges of isolated practice into opportunities that accelerated their professional development. Discussion: Remote supervision was not necessarily problematic but instead provided rich learning for doctors training in and for the context where they were needed. Registrars learnt through clinical responsibility for defined populations and longitudinal, supportive supervisory relationships. Responsibility and continuity may be as important as supervisory proximity for experienced registrars.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 32 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 3%
Unknown 31 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 31%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 16%
Professor 4 13%
Lecturer > Senior Lecturer 2 6%
Researcher 2 6%
Other 5 16%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 10 31%
Social Sciences 9 28%
Psychology 3 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 6%
Sports and Recreations 1 3%
Other 2 6%
Unknown 5 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 July 2016.
All research outputs
#4,222,727
of 8,019,832 outputs
Outputs from Medical Teacher
#889
of 1,269 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#90,668
of 187,073 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Medical Teacher
#54
of 81 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,019,832 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 27th percentile – i.e., 27% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,269 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.5. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 187,073 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 81 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 18th percentile – i.e., 18% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.