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A Gigantic, Exceptionally Complete Titanosaurian Sauropod Dinosaur from Southern Patagonia, Argentina

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, September 2014
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)

Citations

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181 Mendeley
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1 CiteULike
Title
A Gigantic, Exceptionally Complete Titanosaurian Sauropod Dinosaur from Southern Patagonia, Argentina
Published in
Scientific Reports, September 2014
DOI 10.1038/srep06196
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenneth J. Lacovara, Matthew C. Lamanna, Lucio M. Ibiricu, Jason C. Poole, Elena R. Schroeter, Paul V. Ullmann, Kristyn K. Voegele, Zachary M. Boles, Aja M. Carter, Emma K. Fowler, Victoria M. Egerton, Alison E. Moyer, Christopher L. Coughenour, Jason P. Schein, Jerald D. Harris, Rubén D. Martínez, Fernando E. Novas

Abstract

Titanosaurian sauropod dinosaurs were the most diverse and abundant large-bodied herbivores in the southern continents during the final 30 million years of the Mesozoic Era. Several titanosaur species are regarded as the most massive land-living animals yet discovered; nevertheless, nearly all of these giant titanosaurs are known only from very incomplete fossils, hindering a detailed understanding of their anatomy. Here we describe a new and gigantic titanosaur, Dreadnoughtus schrani, from Upper Cretaceous sediments in southern Patagonia, Argentina. Represented by approximately 70% of the postcranial skeleton, plus craniodental remains, Dreadnoughtus is the most complete giant titanosaur yet discovered, and provides new insight into the morphology and evolutionary history of these colossal animals. Furthermore, despite its estimated mass of about 59.3 metric tons, the bone histology of the Dreadnoughtus type specimen reveals that this individual was still growing at the time of death.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 403 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 181 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 5 3%
Spain 2 1%
Canada 2 1%
Chile 2 1%
Italy 1 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Argentina 1 <1%
Colombia 1 <1%
Portugal 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 165 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 35 19%
Researcher 34 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 33 18%
Student > Master 14 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 11 6%
Other 38 21%
Unknown 16 9%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 68 38%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 62 34%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 3%
Environmental Science 5 3%
Computer Science 4 2%
Other 15 8%
Unknown 21 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1183. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 February 2020.
All research outputs
#3,445
of 14,571,066 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#67
of 75,794 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43
of 201,524 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,571,066 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 75,794 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 201,524 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them