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Mammalian odorant receptor tuning breadth persists across distinct odorant panels

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, September 2017
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Title
Mammalian odorant receptor tuning breadth persists across distinct odorant panels
Published in
PLoS ONE, September 2017
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0185329
Pubmed ID
Authors

Devin Kepchia, Benjamin Sherman, Rafi Haddad, Charles W. Luetje

Abstract

The molecular receptive range (MRR) of a mammalian odorant receptor (OR) is the set of odorant structures that activate the OR, while the distribution of these odorant structures across odor space is the tuning breadth of the OR. Variation in tuning breadth is thought to be an important property of ORs, with the MRRs of these receptors varying from narrowly to broadly tuned. However, defining the tuning breadth of an OR is a technical challenge. For practical reasons, a screening panel that broadly covers odor space must be limited to sparse coverage of the many potential structures in that space. When screened with such a panel, ORs with different odorant specificities, but equal tuning breadths, might appear to have different tuning breadths due to chance. We hypothesized that ORs would maintain their tuning breadths across distinct odorant panels. We constructed a new screening panel that was broadly distributed across an estimated odor space and contained compounds distinct from previous panels. We used this new screening panel to test several murine ORs that were previously characterized as having different tuning breadths. ORs were expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes and assayed by two-electrode voltage clamp electrophysiology. MOR256-17, an OR previously characterized as broadly tuned, responded to nine novel compounds from our new screening panel that were structurally diverse and broadly dispersed across an estimated odor space. MOR256-22, an OR previously characterized as narrowly tuned, responded to a single novel compound that was structurally similar to a previously known ligand for this receptor. MOR174-9, a well-characterized receptor with a narrowly tuned MRR, did not respond to any novel compounds in our new panel. These results support the idea that variation in tuning breadth among these three ORs is not an artifact of the screening protocol, but is an intrinsic property of the receptors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 10 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 10 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 30%
Researcher 2 20%
Professor 1 10%
Student > Bachelor 1 10%
Student > Master 1 10%
Other 1 10%
Unknown 1 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Neuroscience 2 20%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 20%
Physics and Astronomy 1 10%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 1 10%
Social Sciences 1 10%
Other 2 20%
Unknown 1 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2017.
All research outputs
#9,078,524
of 11,828,942 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#90,697
of 130,218 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#180,199
of 269,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#1,932
of 2,750 outputs
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