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Operationalizing resilience for adaptive coral reef management under global environmental change

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (78th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
policy
1 policy source
twitter
34 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
78 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
420 Mendeley
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Title
Operationalizing resilience for adaptive coral reef management under global environmental change
Published in
Global Change Biology, September 2014
DOI 10.1111/gcb.12700
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kenneth R.N. Anthony, Paul A. Marshall, Ameer Abdulla, Roger Beeden, Chris Bergh, Ryan Black, C. Mark Eakin, Edward T. Game, Margaret Gooch, Nicholas A.J. Graham, Alison Green, Scott F. Heron, Ruben van Hooidonk, Cheryl Knowland, Sangeeta Mangubhai, Nadine Marshall, Jeffrey A. Maynard, Peter McGinnity, Elizabeth McLeod, Peter. J. Mumby, Magnus Nyström, David Obura, Jamie Oliver, Hugh P. Possingham, Robert L. Pressey, Gwilym P. Rowlands, Jerker Tamelander, David Wachenfeld, Stephanie Wear

Abstract

Cumulative pressures from global climate and ocean change combined with multiple regional and local-scale stressors pose fundamental challenges to coral reef managers worldwide. Understanding how cumulative stressors affect coral reef vulnerability is critical for successful reef conservation now and in the future. In this review, we present the case that strategically managing for increased ecological resilience (capacity for stress resistance and recovery) can reduce coral reef vulnerability (risk of net decline) up to a point. Specifically, we propose an operational framework for identifying effective management levers to enhance resilience and support management decisions that reduce reef vulnerability. Building on a system understanding of biological and ecological processes that drive resilience of coral reefs in different environmental and socio-economic settings, we present an Adaptive Resilience-Based management (ARBM) framework and suggest a set of guidelines for how and where resilience can be enhanced via management interventions. We argue that press-type stressors (pollution, sedimentation, overfishing, ocean warming and acidification) are key threats to coral reef resilience by affecting processes underpinning resistance and recovery, while pulse-type (acute) stressors (e.g. storms, bleaching events, crown-of-thorns starfish outbreaks) increase the demand for resilience. We apply the framework to a set of example problems for Caribbean and Indo-Pacific reefs. A combined strategy of active risk reduction and resilience support is needed, informed by key management objectives, knowledge of reef ecosystem processes and consideration of environmental and social drivers. As climate change and ocean acidification erode the resilience and increase the vulnerability of coral reefs globally, successful adaptive management of coral reefs will become increasingly difficult. Given limited resources, on-the-ground solutions are likely to focus increasingly on actions that support resilience at finer spatial scales, and that are tightly linked to ecosystem goods and services.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 34 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 420 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 9 2%
Mexico 4 <1%
Sweden 3 <1%
Malaysia 2 <1%
Greece 2 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Poland 1 <1%
Italy 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Other 9 2%
Unknown 387 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 102 24%
Researcher 93 22%
Student > Master 74 18%
Student > Bachelor 40 10%
Other 26 6%
Other 85 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 183 44%
Environmental Science 144 34%
Unspecified 37 9%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 17 4%
Social Sciences 9 2%
Other 30 7%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 32. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 November 2018.
All research outputs
#453,821
of 12,455,345 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#532
of 3,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,176
of 202,737 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#16
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,455,345 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.7. This one has done well, scoring higher than 84% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 202,737 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.