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FACULTATIVE PARASITISM BY THE BIVALVE KURTIELLA PEDROANA IN THE SAND CRAB EMERITA ANALOGA

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Parasitology, August 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (61st percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (79th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
4 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
3 Dimensions

Readers on

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9 Mendeley
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Title
FACULTATIVE PARASITISM BY THE BIVALVE KURTIELLA PEDROANA IN THE SAND CRAB EMERITA ANALOGA
Published in
Journal of Parasitology, August 2017
DOI 10.1645/17-28
Pubmed ID
Authors

Ritin Bhaduri, Paul Valentich-Scott, Mark Hilgers, Rajvir Singh, Mikaila Hickman, Kevin Lafferty, R. N. Bhaduri, P. Valentich-Scott, M. S. Hilgers, R. Singh, M. E. Hickman, K. D. Lafferty

Abstract

It is rare that an organism capable of independent or commensalistic existence can also become endoparasitic on a host. In this study, we documented a potential step toward parasitism in the commensal clam Kurtiella pedroana (Bivalvia: Galeommatoidea). Galeommatoideans are known commensals of various invertebrates, including crustaceans. Emerita analoga (Decapoda: Hippidae) is an abundant intertidal decapod inhabiting sandy beaches of the Pacific coast of North and South America. Crabs collected from Monterey Bay, California, were measured and examined externally and internally for associated molluscs. Out of the 520 crabs, 37 large female individuals harbored 49 bivalves (prevalence of 7.11% and mean intensity of 1.3). Forty-one ectocommensal clams were either inside the crab's branchial chambers or on their lateroventral surfaces, and were attached by byssal threads. Our key finding was eight clams that lacked byssal threads and were living in the hemocoel. These internal clams were significantly smaller than the ectocommensals. Because these internal clams lacked access to their normal food, we hypothesize they might have fed on their host's hemolymph as would a parasite. This clam species likely can't reproduce inside its host, implying that endoparasitism is a dead-end state for K. pedroana. Facultative parasitism in a free-living or an ectocommensal is uncommon and suggests a pathway to parasitism.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 3 33%
Researcher 3 33%
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 22%
Student > Master 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 33%
Environmental Science 2 22%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 11%
Social Sciences 1 11%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 11%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 1 11%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,373,880
of 12,390,159 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Parasitology
#1,265
of 1,806 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#103,845
of 273,389 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Parasitology
#5
of 24 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,390,159 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,806 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.0. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,389 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 61% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 24 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its contemporaries.