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A randomised trial of the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplements on the human intestinal microbiota

Overview of attention for article published in Gut, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
1 news outlet
blogs
1 blog
twitter
405 tweeters
patent
1 patent
facebook
13 Facebook pages
reddit
2 Redditors
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
173 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
271 Mendeley
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Title
A randomised trial of the effect of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplements on the human intestinal microbiota
Published in
Gut, September 2017
DOI 10.1136/gutjnl-2017-314968
Pubmed ID
Authors

Henry Watson, Suparna Mitra, Fiona C Croden, Morag Taylor, Henry M Wood, Sarah L Perry, Jade A Spencer, Phil Quirke, Giles J Toogood, Clare L Lawton, Louise Dye, Paul M Loadman, Mark A Hull

Abstract

Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have anticolorectal cancer (CRC) activity. The intestinal microbiota has been implicated in colorectal carcinogenesis. Dietary omega-3 PUFAs alter the mouse intestinal microbiome compatible with antineoplastic activity. Therefore, we investigated the effect of omega-3 PUFA supplements on the faecal microbiome in middle-aged, healthy volunteers (n=22). A randomised, open-label, cross-over trial of 8 weeks' treatment with 4 g mixed eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid in two formulations (soft-gel capsules and Smartfish drinks), separated by a 12-week 'washout' period. Faecal samples were collected at five time-points for microbiome analysis by 16S ribosomal RNA PCR and Illumina MiSeq sequencing. Red blood cell (RBC) fatty acid analysis was performed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Both omega-3 PUFA formulations induced similar changes in RBC fatty acid content, except that drinks were associated with a larger, and more prolonged, decrease in omega-6 PUFA arachidonic acid than the capsule intervention (p=0.02). There were no significant changes in α or β diversity, or phyla composition, associated with omega-3 PUFA supplementation. However, a reversible increased abundance of several genera, including Bifidobacterium, Roseburia and Lactobacillus was observed with one or both omega-3 PUFA interventions. Microbiome changes did not correlate with RBC omega-3 PUFA incorporation or development of omega-3 PUFA-induced diarrhoea. There were no treatment order effects. Omega-3 PUFA supplementation induces a reversible increase in several short-chain fatty acid-producing bacteria, independently of the method of administration. There is no simple relationship between the intestinal microbiome and systemic omega-3 PUFA exposure. ISRCTN18662143.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 405 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 271 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 271 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 45 17%
Researcher 39 14%
Student > Master 38 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 15 6%
Other 42 15%
Unknown 60 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 47 17%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 42 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 25 9%
Immunology and Microbiology 17 6%
Other 37 14%
Unknown 72 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 250. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2021.
All research outputs
#88,993
of 19,149,304 outputs
Outputs from Gut
#64
of 6,256 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#2,588
of 289,885 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Gut
#2
of 73 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,149,304 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,256 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.8. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 289,885 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 73 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.