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Creative music therapy to promote brain structure, function, and neurobehavioral outcomes in preterm infants: a randomized controlled pilot trial protocol

Overview of attention for article published in Pilot and Feasibility Studies, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (87th percentile)

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19 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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7 Dimensions

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97 Mendeley
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Title
Creative music therapy to promote brain structure, function, and neurobehavioral outcomes in preterm infants: a randomized controlled pilot trial protocol
Published in
Pilot and Feasibility Studies, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40814-017-0180-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Friederike Barbara Haslbeck, Hans-Ulrich Bucher, Dirk Bassler, Cornelia Hagmann

Abstract

Preterm birth is associated with increased risk of neurological impairment and deficits in cognition, motor function, and behavioral problems. Limited studies indicate that multi-sensory experiences support brain development in preterm infants. Music appears to promote neurobiological processes and neuronal learning in the human brain. Creative music therapy (CMT) is an individualized, interactive therapeutic approach based on the theory and methods of Nordoff and Robbins. CMT may promote brain development in preterm infants via concurrent interaction and meaningful auditory stimulation. We hypothesize that preterm infants who receive creative music therapy during neonatal intensive care admission will have developmental benefits short- and long-term brain function. A prospective, randomized controlled single-center pilot trial involving 60 clinically stable preterm infants under 32 weeks of gestational age is conducted in preparation for a multi-center trial. Thirty infants each are randomized to either standard neonatal intensive care or standard care with CMT. Music therapy intervention is approximately 20 min in duration three times per week. A trained music therapist sings for the infants in lullaby style, individually entrained and adjusted to the infant's rhythm and affect. Primary objectives of this study are feasibility of protocol implementation and investigating the potential mechanism of efficacy for this new intervention. To examine the effect of this new intervention, non-invasive, quantitative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) methods at corrected age and standardized neurodevelopmental assessments using the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development third edition at a corrected age of 24 months and Kaufman Assessment Battery for Children at 5 years will be performed. All assessments will be performed and analyzed by blinded experts. To our knowledge, this is the first randomized controlled clinical trial to systematically examine possible effects of creative music therapy on short- and long-term brain development in preterm infants. This project lies at the interface of music therapy, neuroscience, and medical imaging. New insights into the potential role and impact of music on brain function and development may be elucidated. If such a low-cost, low-risk intervention is demonstrated in a future multi-center trial to be effective in supporting brain development in preterm neonates, findings could have broad clinical implications for this vulnerable patient population. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02434224.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 97 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 97 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 21 22%
Researcher 15 15%
Student > Bachelor 9 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 8 8%
Student > Postgraduate 6 6%
Other 18 19%
Unknown 20 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 18%
Psychology 12 12%
Neuroscience 12 12%
Arts and Humanities 10 10%
Nursing and Health Professions 7 7%
Other 14 14%
Unknown 25 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 17. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 January 2020.
All research outputs
#1,183,652
of 15,482,068 outputs
Outputs from Pilot and Feasibility Studies
#59
of 526 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#33,455
of 278,041 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Pilot and Feasibility Studies
#1
of 3 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,482,068 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 92nd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 526 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 7.6. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 278,041 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 87% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them