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Replication of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in fibroblasts does not require Atg5-dependent macroautophagy

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Microbiology, September 2014
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2 tweeters
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1 peer review site

Citations

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29 Mendeley
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Title
Replication of Brucella abortus and Brucella melitensis in fibroblasts does not require Atg5-dependent macroautophagy
Published in
BMC Microbiology, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12866-014-0223-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Isabelle Hamer, Emeline Goffin, Xavier De Bolle, Jean-Jacques Letesson, Michel Jadot

Abstract

BackgroundSeveral intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved subtle strategies to subvert vesicular trafficking pathways of their host cells to avoid killing and to replicate inside the cells. Brucellae are Gram-negative facultative intracellular bacteria that are responsible for brucellosis, a worldwide extended chronic zoonosis. Following invasion, Brucella abortus is found in a vacuole that interacts first with various endosomal compartments and then with endoplasmic reticulum sub-compartments. Brucella establishes its replication niche in ER-derived vesicles. In the past, it has been proposed that B. abortus passed through the macroautophagy pathway before reaching its niche of replication. However, recent experiments provided evidence that the classical macroautophagy pathway was not involved in the intracellular trafficking and the replication of B. abortus in bone marrow-derived macrophages and in HeLa cells. In contrast, another study showed that macroautophagy favoured the survival and the replication of Brucella melitensis in infected RAW264.7 macrophages. This raises the possibility that B. abortus and B. melitensis followed different intracellular pathways before replicating. In the present work, we have addressed this issue by comparing the replication rate of B. abortus and B. melitensis in embryonic fibroblasts derived from wild-type and Atg5¿/¿ mice, Atg5 being a core component of the canonical macroautophagic pathway.ResultsOur results indicate that both B. abortus S2308 and B. melitensis 16M strains are able to invade and replicate in Atg5-deficient fibroblasts, suggesting that the canonical Atg5-dependent macroautophagic pathway is dispensable for Brucella replication. The number of viable bacteria was even slightly higher in Atg5¿/¿ fibroblasts than in wild-type fibroblasts. This increase could be due to a more efficient uptake or to a better survival rate of bacteria before the beginning of the replication in Atg5-deficient cells as compared to wild-type cells. Moreover, our data show that the infection with B. abortus or with B. melitensis does not stimulate neither the conversion of LC3-I into LC3-II nor the membrane recruitment of LC3 onto the BCV.ConclusionOur study suggests that like Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis does not subvert the canonical macroautophagy to reach its replicative niche or to stimulate its replication.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 24%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 17%
Student > Postgraduate 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 10%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 1 3%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 48%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 14%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 7%
Unspecified 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 3 10%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2016.
All research outputs
#7,141,224
of 12,372,633 outputs
Outputs from BMC Microbiology
#819
of 1,804 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#88,915
of 205,488 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Microbiology
#3
of 7 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,372,633 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,804 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.8. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,488 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 7 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 4 of them.