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A short-term longitudinal study of correlates and sequelae of attachment security in autism

Overview of attention for article published in Attachment & Human Development, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#6 of 235)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
5 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
1 tweeter

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
46 Mendeley
Title
A short-term longitudinal study of correlates and sequelae of attachment security in autism
Published in
Attachment & Human Development, September 2017
DOI 10.1080/14616734.2017.1383489
Pubmed ID
Authors

Agata Rozga, Erik Hesse, Mary Main, Robbie Duschinsky, Leila Beckwith, Marian Sigman

Abstract

In this short-term longitudinal study, 30 preschool-aged children with autism were first observed in Ainsworth's Strange Situation Procedure and, separately, interacting with the primary caregiver in the home. One year later, each child completed both a developmental assessment and an observational assessment of empathic responding. Behaviors typical for children with autism were distinguished from behaviors suggestive of relationally based attachment disorganization. Forty-five percent of the children were classified as securely attached. The secure group demonstrated language skills superior to those of the insecurely attached group, concurrently and during the follow-up. Compared to parents of children who were insecurely attached, parents of securely attached children were rated as more sensitive. Compared to both organized insecure and disorganized children, secure children were rated as more responsive to an examiner's apparent distress during the follow-up relative to their ratings at intake, whereas empathy ratings of children with insecure classifications did not increase. Importantly, attachment security was associated with empathy above and beyond the contribution of children's language level. These results indicate that the sequelae of attachment security in autism may be similar to those documented for typically developing children.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 46 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 46 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 10 22%
Student > Bachelor 8 17%
Researcher 7 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 9%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 7 15%
Unknown 7 15%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 22 48%
Medicine and Dentistry 4 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 7%
Social Sciences 3 7%
Arts and Humanities 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 10 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 46. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2017.
All research outputs
#294,910
of 11,911,448 outputs
Outputs from Attachment & Human Development
#6
of 235 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#14,573
of 270,881 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Attachment & Human Development
#2
of 9 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,911,448 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 235 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.2. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 270,881 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 9 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 7 of them.