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First Ancient Mitochondrial Human Genome from a Prepastoralist Southern African

Overview of attention for article published in Genome Biology & Evolution, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#10 of 2,254)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
16 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
53 tweeters
facebook
5 Facebook pages
wikipedia
2 Wikipedia pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users

Citations

dimensions_citation
26 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
145 Mendeley
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Title
First Ancient Mitochondrial Human Genome from a Prepastoralist Southern African
Published in
Genome Biology & Evolution, September 2014
DOI 10.1093/gbe/evu202
Pubmed ID
Authors

Alan G. Morris, Anja Heinze, Eva K.F. Chan, Andrew B. Smith, Vanessa M. Hayes

Abstract

The oldest contemporary human mitochondrial lineages arose in Africa. The earliest divergent extant maternal offshoot, namely haplogroup L0d, is represented by click-speaking forager peoples of Southern Africa. Broadly defined as Khoesan, contemporary Khoesan are today largely restricted to the semi-desert regions of Namibia and Botswana, while archeological, historical and genetic evidence promotes a once broader southerly dispersal of click-speaking peoples including southward migrating pastoralists and indigenous marine-foragers. Today extinct, no genetic data has been recovered from the indigenous peoples that once sustained life along the southern coastal waters of Africa pre-pastoral arrival. In this study we generate a complete mitochondrial genome from a 2,330 year old male skeleton, confirmed via osteological and archeological analysis as practicing a marine-based forager existence. The ancient mtDNA represents a new L0d2c lineage (L0d2c1c) that is today, unlike its Khoe-language based sister-clades (L0d2c1a and L0d2c1b) most closely related to contemporary indigenous San-speakers (specifically Ju). Providing the first genomic evidence that pre-pastoral Southern African marine foragers carried the earliest diverged maternal modern human lineages, this study emphasizes the significance of Southern African archeological remains in defining early modern human origins.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 53 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 145 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 2%
South Africa 2 1%
Germany 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 136 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 49 34%
Researcher 25 17%
Student > Bachelor 16 11%
Student > Master 12 8%
Student > Postgraduate 9 6%
Other 26 18%
Unknown 8 6%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 71 49%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 22 15%
Social Sciences 15 10%
Arts and Humanities 6 4%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 4 3%
Other 18 12%
Unknown 9 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 188. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 July 2019.
All research outputs
#101,529
of 16,060,310 outputs
Outputs from Genome Biology & Evolution
#10
of 2,254 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,247
of 205,626 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genome Biology & Evolution
#1
of 77 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,060,310 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,254 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 205,626 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 77 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.