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How to minimise the incidence of transport-related problem behaviours in horses: a review

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Equine Science, January 2017
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1 tweeter

Citations

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2 Dimensions

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9 Mendeley
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Title
How to minimise the incidence of transport-related problem behaviours in horses: a review
Published in
Journal of Equine Science, January 2017
DOI 10.1294/jes.28.67
Pubmed ID
Authors

Amanda YORKE, Judith MATUSIEWICZ, Barbara PADALINO

Abstract

This review aims to provide practical outcomes on how to minimise the incidence of transport-related problem behaviours (TRPBs) in horses. TRPBs are unwanted behaviours occurring during different phases of transport, most commonly, a reluctance to load and scrambling during travelling. TRPBs can result in injuries to horses and horse handlers, horse trailer accidents, disruption of time schedules, inability to attend competitions, and poor performance following travel. Therefore, TRPBs are recognised as both a horse-related risk to humans and a human-related risk to horses. From the literature, it is apparent that TRPBs are common throughout the entire equine industry, and a YouTube keyword search of 'horse trailer loading' produced over 67,000 results, demonstrating considerable interest in this topic and the variety of solutions suggested. Drawing upon articles published over the last 35 years, this review summarises current knowledge on TRPBs and provides recommendations on their identification, management, and prevention. It appears that a positive human-horse relationship, in-hand pre-training, systematic training for loading and travelling, appropriate horse handling, and the vehicle driving skills of the transporters are crucial to minimise the incidence of TRPBs. In-hand pre-training based on correct application of the principles of learning for horses and horse handlers, habituation to loading and travelling, and self-loading appear to minimise the risk of TRPBs and are therefore strongly recommended to safeguard horse and horse-handler health and welfare. This review indicates that further research and education with respect to transport management are essential to substantially decrease the incidence of TRPBs in horses.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 9 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 9 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 2 22%
Student > Postgraduate 2 22%
Student > Master 2 22%
Other 1 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 11%
Other 1 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 44%
Unspecified 2 22%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 11%
Psychology 1 11%
Sports and Recreations 1 11%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2017.
All research outputs
#10,507,784
of 11,857,470 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Equine Science
#46
of 52 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229,562
of 272,180 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Equine Science
#4
of 4 outputs
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So far Altmetric has tracked 52 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 1.9. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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