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Was the Mw 7.5 1952 Kern County, California, earthquake induced (or triggered)?

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Seismology, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#5 of 116)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (89th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (80th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
2 blogs
twitter
9 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

dimensions_citation
2 Dimensions

Readers on

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22 Mendeley
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Title
Was the Mw 7.5 1952 Kern County, California, earthquake induced (or triggered)?
Published in
Journal of Seismology, October 2017
DOI 10.1007/s10950-017-9685-x
Pubmed ID
Authors

Susan E. Hough, Victor C. Tsai, Robert Walker, Fred Aminzadeh

Abstract

Several recent studies have presented evidence that significant induced earthquakes occurred in a number of oil-producing regions during the early and mid-twentieth century related to either production or wastewater injection. We consider whether the 21 July 1952 Mw 7.5 Kern County earthquake might have been induced by production in the Wheeler Ridge oil field. The mainshock, which was not preceded by any significant foreshocks, occurred 98 days after the initial production of oil in Eocene strata at depths reaching 3 km, within ~1 km of the White Wolf fault (WWF). Based on this spatial and temporal proximity, we explore a potential causal relationship between the earthquake and oil production. While production would have normally be expected to have reduced pore pressure, inhibiting failure on the WWF, we present an analytical model based on industry stratigraphic data and best estimates of parameters whereby an impermeable splay fault adjacent to the main WWF could plausibly have blocked direct pore pressure effects, allowing the poroelastic stress change associated with production to destabilize the WWF, promoting initial failure. This proof-of-concept model can also account for the 98-day delay between the onset of production and the earthquake. While the earthquake clearly released stored tectonic stress, any initial perturbation on or near a major fault system can trigger a larger rupture. Our proposed mechanism provides an explanation for why significant earthquakes are not commonly induced by production in proximity to major faults.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 9 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 22 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 22 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 6 27%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 23%
Unspecified 4 18%
Other 2 9%
Student > Master 2 9%
Other 3 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Earth and Planetary Sciences 14 64%
Unspecified 5 23%
Environmental Science 1 5%
Physics and Astronomy 1 5%
Engineering 1 5%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 19. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2017.
All research outputs
#777,020
of 12,797,549 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Seismology
#5
of 116 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#29,363
of 272,383 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Seismology
#1
of 5 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,797,549 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 116 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,383 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 89% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 5 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them