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BETTER HEALTH: Durham -- protocol for a cluster randomized trial of BETTER in community and public health settings

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Public Health, September 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (74th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (60th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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4 Dimensions

Readers on

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85 Mendeley
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Title
BETTER HEALTH: Durham -- protocol for a cluster randomized trial of BETTER in community and public health settings
Published in
BMC Public Health, September 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12889-017-4797-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lawrence Paszat, Rinku Sutradhar, Mary Ann O’Brien, Aisha Lofters, Andrew Pinto, Peter Selby, Nancy Baxter, Peter D. Donnelly, Regina Elliott, Richard H. Glazier, Robert Kyle, Donna Manca, Mary-Anne Pietrusiak, Linda Rabeneck, Nicolette Sopcak, Jill Tinmouth, Becky Wall, Eva Grunfeld

Abstract

The Building on Existing Tools to Improve Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening (BETTER) cluster randomized trial in primary care settings demonstrated a 30% improvement in adherence to evidence-based Chronic Disease Prevention and Screening (CDPS) activities. CDPS activities included healthy activities, lifestyle modifications, and screening tests. We present a protocol for the adaptation of BETTER to a public health setting, and testing the adaptation in a cluster randomized trial (BETTER HEALTH: Durham) among low income neighbourhoods in Durham Region, Ontario (Canada). The BETTER intervention consists of a personalized prevention visit between a participant and a prevention practitioner, which is focused on the participant's eligible CDPS activities, and uses Brief Action Planning, to empower the participant to set achievable short-term goals. Durham aims to establish that the BETTER intervention can be adapted and proven effective among 40-64 year old residents of low income areas when provided in the community by public health nurses trained as prevention practitioners. Focus groups and key informant interviews among stakeholders and eligible residents of low income areas will inform the adaptation, along with feedback from the trial's Community Advisory Committee. We have created a sampling frame of 16 clusters composed of census dissemination areas in the lowest urban quintile of median household income, and will sample 10 clusters to be randomly allocated to immediate intervention or six month wait list control. Accounting for the clustered design effect, the trial will have 80% power to detect an absolute 30% difference in the primary outcome, a composite score of completed eligible CDPS actions six months after enrollment. The prevention practitioner will attempt to link participants without a primary care provider (PCP) to a local PCP. The implementation of BETTER HEALTH: Durham will be evaluated by focus groups and key informant interviews. The effectiveness of BETTER HEALTH: Durham will be tested for delivery in low income neighbourhoods by a public health department. NCT03052959, registered February 10, 2017.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 85 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 85 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 14 16%
Researcher 10 12%
Student > Master 7 8%
Student > Ph. D. Student 5 6%
Lecturer 3 4%
Other 11 13%
Unknown 35 41%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 17 20%
Nursing and Health Professions 15 18%
Psychology 6 7%
Social Sciences 2 2%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 1%
Other 6 7%
Unknown 38 45%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 7. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 27 February 2018.
All research outputs
#3,588,295
of 18,025,039 outputs
Outputs from BMC Public Health
#4,013
of 12,143 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#71,932
of 287,716 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Public Health
#10
of 23 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 18,025,039 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 79th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 12,143 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 12.7. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 287,716 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 74% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 23 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 60% of its contemporaries.