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Nodal skip metastasis in thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a cohort study

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Surgery, May 2017
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Title
Nodal skip metastasis in thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma: a cohort study
Published in
BMC Surgery, May 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12893-017-0247-5
Pubmed ID
Authors

Francesco Cavallin, Rita Alfieri, Marco Scarpa, Matteo Cagol, Alberto Ruol, Matteo Fassan, Massimo Rugge, Ermanno Ancona, Carlo Castoro

Abstract

Nodal skip metastasis is a prognostic factor in some sites of malignancies, but its role in esophageal cancer is still unclear. The present study aimed to investigate occurrence and effect of nodal skip metastases in thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. All 578 patients undergoing esophagectomy for thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma at the Center for Esophageal Diseases located in Padova between January 1992 and December 2010 were retrospectively evaluated. Selection criteria were R0 resection, pathological M0 stage and pathological lymph node involvement. Patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy were excluded. The selection identified 88 patients with lymph node involvement confirmed by pathological evaluation. Sixteen patients (18.2%) had nodal skip metastasis. Adjusting for the number of lymph node metastases, patient with nodal skip metastasis had similar 5-year overall survival (14% vs. 13%, p = 0.93) and 5-year disease free survival (14% vs. 9%, p = 0.48) compared to patients with both peritumoral and distant lymph node metastases. The risk difference of nodal skip metastasis was: -24.1% (95% C.I. -43.1% to -5.2%) in patients with more than one lymph node metastasis compared to those with one lymph node metastasis; -2.3% (95% C.I. -29.8% to 25.2%) in middle thoracic esophagus and -23.0% (95% C.I. -47.8% to 1.8%) in lower thoracic esophagus compared to upper thoracic esophagus; 18.1% (95% C.I. 3.2% to 33.0%) in clinical N0 stage vs. clinical N+ stage. Nodal skip metastasis is a common pattern of metastatic lymph involvement in thoracic esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. However, neither overall survival nor disease free survival are associated with nodal skip metastasis occurrence.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 12 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 12 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 3 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 17%
Other 2 17%
Student > Master 2 17%
Librarian 1 8%
Other 2 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 7 58%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 8%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 8%
Unknown 3 25%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 02 October 2017.
All research outputs
#10,507,788
of 11,857,470 outputs
Outputs from BMC Surgery
#318
of 419 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#229,900
of 272,681 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Surgery
#6
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,857,470 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 419 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.4. This one is in the 1st percentile – i.e., 1% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.