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Calcium in the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis: EMAS clinical guide

Overview of attention for article published in Maturitas, January 2018
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • One of the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#4 of 1,883)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
15 news outlets
twitter
39 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
57 Mendeley
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Title
Calcium in the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis: EMAS clinical guide
Published in
Maturitas, January 2018
DOI 10.1016/j.maturitas.2017.10.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Antonio Cano, Peter Chedraui, Dimitrios G. Goulis, Patrice Lopes, Gita Mishra, Alfred Mueck, Levent M. Senturk, Tommaso Simoncini, John C. Stevenson, Petra Stute, Pauliina Tuomikoski, Margaret Rees, Irene Lambrinoudaki

Abstract

Postmenopausal osteoporosis is a highly prevalent disease. Prevention through lifestyle measures includes an adequate calcium intake. Despite the guidance provided by scientific societies and governmental bodies worldwide, many issues remain unresolved. To provide evidence regarding the impact of calcium intake on the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and critically appraise current guidelines. Literature review and consensus of expert opinion. The recommended daily intake of calcium varies between 700 and 1200mg of elemental calcium, depending on the endorsing source. Although calcium can be derived either from the diet or supplements, the former source is preferred. Intake below the recommended amount may increase fragility fracture risk; however, there is no consistent evidence that calcium supplementation at, or above, recommended levels reduces risk. The addition of vitamin D may minimally reduce fractures, mainly among institutionalised people. Excessive intake of calcium, defined as higher than 2000mg/day, can be potentially harmful. Some studies demonstrated harm even at lower dosages. An increased risk for cardiovascular events, urolithiasis and even fractures has been found in association with excessive calcium intake, but this issue remains unresolved. In conclusion, an adequate intake of calcium is recommended for general bone health. Excessive calcium intake seems of no benefit, and could possibly be harmful.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 39 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 57 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 57 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 20 35%
Unspecified 9 16%
Researcher 6 11%
Other 6 11%
Student > Master 5 9%
Other 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 20 35%
Unspecified 11 19%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 9%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 4 7%
Other 11 19%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 139. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 23 October 2018.
All research outputs
#90,288
of 12,395,470 outputs
Outputs from Maturitas
#4
of 1,883 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,703
of 275,106 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Maturitas
#1
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,395,470 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,883 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.4. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,106 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.