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Progress on the Surface Nanobubble Story: What is in the bubble? Why does it exist?

Overview of attention for article published in Advances in Colloid & Interface Science, August 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (58th percentile)

Mentioned by

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1 tweeter
weibo
1 weibo user

Citations

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33 Dimensions

Readers on

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73 Mendeley
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Title
Progress on the Surface Nanobubble Story: What is in the bubble? Why does it exist?
Published in
Advances in Colloid & Interface Science, August 2015
DOI 10.1016/j.cis.2014.09.004
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hong Peng, Greg R. Birkett, Anh V. Nguyen

Abstract

Interfaces between aqueous solutions and hydrophobic solid surfaces are important in various areas of science and technology. Many researchers have found that forces between hydrophobic surfaces in aqueous solution are significantly different from the classical DLVO theory. Long-range attractive forces (non-DLVO forces) are thought to be affected by nanoscopic gaseous domains at the interfaces. This is a review of the latest research on nanobubbles at hydrophobic surfaces from experimental and simulation studies. The review focusses on non-intrusive optical view of surface nanobubbles and gas enrichment on solid surfaces by imaging and force mapping. By use of these recent experimental data in conjunction with molecular simulation work, all major theories on surface nanobubble formation and stability are critically reviewed. Even though the current body of research cannot comprehensively explain all properties of surface nanobubbles observed, the fundamental understanding has been significantly improved. Line tension has been shown to be incapable of explaining the contact angle of nanobubbles. Dense gas layer theory provides a new explanation on both large contact angle and long-time stability. The high density of gas in these domains may significantly affect the gas-water interface which is in line with some observation made on bulk nanobubbles. Along this line of inquiry, experimental and simulation effort should be focussed on measuring the density within surface nanobubbles and the properties of the gas water interface which may be the key to explaining the stability of these nanobubbles.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 73 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 3%
China 1 1%
Brazil 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
France 1 1%
Unknown 67 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 16 22%
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 21%
Student > Doctoral Student 11 15%
Researcher 10 14%
Student > Bachelor 9 12%
Other 12 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Engineering 24 33%
Chemistry 10 14%
Unspecified 9 12%
Materials Science 8 11%
Chemical Engineering 7 10%
Other 15 21%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 January 2015.
All research outputs
#6,645,550
of 12,009,201 outputs
Outputs from Advances in Colloid & Interface Science
#253
of 372 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,533
of 210,093 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Advances in Colloid & Interface Science
#1
of 2 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,009,201 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 372 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 2.9. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,093 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 58% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 2 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them