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Association of polymorphisms in the heparanase gene (HPSE) with hepatocellular carcinoma in Chinese populations

Overview of attention for article published in Genetics and Molecular Biology, October 2017
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Title
Association of polymorphisms in the heparanase gene (HPSE) with hepatocellular carcinoma in Chinese populations
Published in
Genetics and Molecular Biology, October 2017
DOI 10.1590/1678-4685-gmb-2014-0338
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lixia Yu, Xiaoai Zhang, Yun Zhai, Hongxing Zhang, Wei Yue, Xiumei Zhang, Zhifu Wang, Hong Zhou, Gangqiao Zhou, Feng Gong

Abstract

Heparanase activity is involved in cancer growth and development in humans and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the heparanase gene (HPSE) have been shown to be associated with tumors. In this study, we investigated whether SNPs in HPSE were a risk factor for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) by undertaking a comprehensive haplotype-tagging, case-control study. For this, six haplotype-tagging SNPs (htSNPs) in HPSE were genotyped in 400 HCC patients and 480 controls by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) analysis. A log-additive model revealed significant correlations between the HPSE polymorphisms rs12331678 and rs12503843 and the risk of HCC in the overall samples (p = 0.0046 and p = 0.0055). When the analysis was stratified based on hepatitis B virus (HBV) carrier status, significant interactions between rs12331678 and rs12503843 and HBV were observed. Conditional logistic regression analysis for the independent effect of one significant SNP suggested that rs12331678 or rs12503843 contributed an independent effect to the significant association with the risk of HCC, respectively. Our findings suggest that the SNPs rs12331678 and rs12503843 are HCC risk factors, although the potential functional roles of these two SNPs remain to be fully elucidated.

Twitter Demographics

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 8 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 8 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Other 2 25%
Student > Bachelor 2 25%
Student > Doctoral Student 1 13%
Lecturer 1 13%
Professor 1 13%
Other 1 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 63%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 25%
Unknown 1 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2017.
All research outputs
#10,525,345
of 11,877,834 outputs
Outputs from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#240
of 286 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#230,174
of 272,983 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Genetics and Molecular Biology
#10
of 16 outputs
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