↓ Skip to main content

Emergence and loss of spliceosomal twin introns

Overview of attention for article published in Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, October 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age

Mentioned by

twitter
2 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
5 Mendeley
You are seeing a free-to-access but limited selection of the activity Altmetric has collected about this research output. Click here to find out more.
Title
Emergence and loss of spliceosomal twin introns
Published in
Fungal Biology and Biotechnology, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40694-017-0037-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Michel Flipphi, Norbert Ág, Levente Karaffa, Napsugár Kavalecz, Gustavo Cerqueira, Claudio Scazzocchio, Erzsébet Fekete

Abstract

In the primary transcript of nuclear genes, coding sequences-exons-usually alternate with non-coding sequences-introns. In the evolution of spliceosomal intron-exon structure, extant intron positions can be abandoned and new intron positions can be occupied. Spliceosomal twin introns ("stwintrons") are unconventional intervening sequences where a standard "internal" intron interrupts a canonical splicing motif of a second, "external" intron. The availability of genome sequences of more than a thousand species of fungi provides a unique opportunity to study spliceosomal intron evolution throughout a whole kingdom by means of molecular phylogenetics. A new stwintron was encountered in Aspergillus nidulans and Aspergillus niger. It is present across three classes of Leotiomyceta in the transcript of a well-conserved gene encoding a putative lipase (lipS). It occupies the same position as a standard intron in the orthologue gene in species of the early divergent classes of the Pezizomycetes and the Orbiliomycetes, suggesting that an internal intron has appeared within a pre-extant intron. On the other hand, the stwintron has been lost from certain taxa in Leotiomycetes and Eurotiomycetes at several occasions, most likely by a mechanism involving reverse transcription and homologous recombination. Another ancient stwintron present across whole Pezizomycotina orders-in the transcript of the bifunctional biotin biosynthesis gene bioDA-occurs at the same position as a standard intron in many species of non-Dikarya. Nevertheless, also the bioDA stwintron has disappeared from certain lineages within the taxa where it occurs, i.e., Sordariomycetes and Botryosphaeriales. Intriguingly, only the internal intron was lost from the Sordariomycetes bioDA stwintron at all but one occasion, leaving a standard intron in the same position, while where the putative lipase stwintron was lost, no intronic sequences remain. Molecular phylogeny of the peptide product was used to monitor the existence and fate of a stwintron in the transcripts of two neatly defined fungal genes, encoding well conserved proteins. Both defining events-stwintron emergence and loss-can be explained with extant models for intron insertion and loss. We thus demonstrate that stwintrons can serve as model systems to study spliceosomal intron evolution.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 5 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 5 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 2 40%
Student > Postgraduate 1 20%
Student > Master 1 20%
Unknown 1 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 60%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 1 20%
Unknown 1 20%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,029,920
of 11,880,222 outputs
Outputs from Fungal Biology and Biotechnology
#39
of 54 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#140,046
of 272,993 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Fungal Biology and Biotechnology
#4
of 6 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,880,222 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 54 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.2. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 272,993 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 47th percentile – i.e., 47% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 6 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than 2 of them.