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The entropic basis of collective behaviour

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of The Royal Society Interface, May 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (92nd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (57th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
28 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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11 Dimensions

Readers on

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81 Mendeley
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Title
The entropic basis of collective behaviour
Published in
Journal of The Royal Society Interface, May 2015
DOI 10.1098/rsif.2015.0037
Pubmed ID
Authors

Richard P. Mann, Roman Garnett

Abstract

We identify a unique viewpoint on the collective behaviour of intelligent agents. We first develop a highly general abstract model for the possible future lives these agents may encounter as a result of their decisions. In the context of these possibilities, we show that the causal entropic principle, whereby agents follow behavioural rules that maximize their entropy over all paths through the future, predicts many of the observed features of social interactions among both human and animal groups. Our results indicate that agents are often able to maximize their future path entropy by remaining cohesive as a group and that this cohesion leads to collectively intelligent outcomes that depend strongly on the distribution of the number of possible future paths. We derive social interaction rules that are consistent with maximum entropy group behaviour for both discrete and continuous decision spaces. Our analysis further predicts that social interactions are likely to be fundamentally based on Weber's law of response to proportional stimuli, supporting many studies that find a neurological basis for this stimulus-response mechanism and providing a novel basis for the common assumption of linearly additive 'social forces' in simulation studies of collective behaviour.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 28 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 81 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 3 4%
United Kingdom 2 2%
Brazil 1 1%
Switzerland 1 1%
Canada 1 1%
Unknown 73 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 20 25%
Researcher 17 21%
Student > Master 9 11%
Professor 5 6%
Student > Doctoral Student 5 6%
Other 25 31%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 26 32%
Computer Science 10 12%
Engineering 9 11%
Physics and Astronomy 8 10%
Unspecified 7 9%
Other 21 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 May 2017.
All research outputs
#781,681
of 12,517,527 outputs
Outputs from Journal of The Royal Society Interface
#440
of 1,975 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#15,952
of 210,979 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of The Royal Society Interface
#29
of 68 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,517,527 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,975 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 19.8. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 210,979 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 92% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 68 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 57% of its contemporaries.