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Do extra compulsory physical education lessons mean more physically active children - findings from the childhood health, activity, and motor performance school study Denmark (The CHAMPS-study DK)

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (94th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
29 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
47 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
162 Mendeley
citeulike
2 CiteULike
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Title
Do extra compulsory physical education lessons mean more physically active children - findings from the childhood health, activity, and motor performance school study Denmark (The CHAMPS-study DK)
Published in
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity, September 2014
DOI 10.1186/s12966-014-0121-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Niels Christian Møller, Jakob Tarp, Eva Friis Kamelarczyk, Jan Christian Brønd, Heidi Klakk, Niels Wedderkopp

Abstract

BackgroundPrimarily, this study aims to examine whether children attending sports schools are more active than their counterpart attending normal schools. Secondary, the study aims to examine if physical activity (PA) levels in specific domains differ across school types. Finally, potential modifications by status of overweight/obesity and poor cardio-respiratory fitness are examined.MethodsParticipants were from the first part of the CHAMPS-study DK, which included approximately 1200 children attending the 0th ¿ 6th grade. At the sports schools, the mandatory physical education (PE) program was increased from 2 to 6 weekly lessons over a 3-year period. Children attending normal schools were offered the standard 2 PE lessons. PA was assessed at two different occasions with the GT3X ActiGraph accelerometer, once during winter in 2009/10 and once during summer/fall in 2010. Leisure time organized sports participation was quantified by SMS track. Based on baseline values in 2008, we generated a high-BMI and a low-cardio-respiratory fitness for age and sex group variable.ResultsThere were no significant differences in PA levels during total time, PE, or recess between children attending sports schools and normal schools, respectively. However, children, especially boys, attending sports schools were more active during school time than children attending normal schools (girls: ß=51, p=0.065; boys: ß=113, p<0.001). However, in the leisure time during weekdays children who attended sports schools were less active (girls: ß=-41, p=0.004; boys: ß=-72, p<0.001) and less involved in leisure time organized sports participation (girls: ß=-0.4, p=0.016; boys: ß=-0.2, p=0.236) than children who attended normal schools. Examination of modification by baseline status of overweight/obesity and low cardio-respiratory fitness indicated that during PE low fit girls in particular were more active at sports schools.ConclusionNo differences were revealed in overall PA levels between children attending sports schools and normal schools. Sports schools children were more active than normal schools children during school time, but less active during leisure time. In girls, less organized sports participation at least partly explained the observed differences in PA levels during leisure time across school types. Baseline status of cardio-respiratory fitness modified school type differences in PA levels during PE in girls.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 29 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 162 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Finland 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Peru 1 <1%
Brazil 1 <1%
Unknown 158 98%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 29 18%
Student > Master 28 17%
Researcher 16 10%
Student > Bachelor 12 7%
Student > Doctoral Student 12 7%
Other 30 19%
Unknown 35 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 36 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 22 14%
Social Sciences 21 13%
Psychology 12 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 9 6%
Other 20 12%
Unknown 42 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 29. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 December 2016.
All research outputs
#740,684
of 15,918,909 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#320
of 1,565 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#11,304
of 211,719 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
#1
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,918,909 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 95th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,565 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.1. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,719 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 94% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them