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Avian influenza virus ecology in Iceland shorebirds: Intercontinental reassortment and movement

Overview of attention for article published in Infection, Genetics & Evolution, December 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (59th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (70th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

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14 Dimensions

Readers on

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28 Mendeley
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2 CiteULike
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Title
Avian influenza virus ecology in Iceland shorebirds: Intercontinental reassortment and movement
Published in
Infection, Genetics & Evolution, December 2014
DOI 10.1016/j.meegid.2014.09.013
Pubmed ID
Authors

Jeffrey S. Hall, Gunnar Thor Hallgrimsson, Kamol Suwannanarn, Srinand Sreevatsen, Hon S. Ip, Ellen Magnusdottir, Joshua L. TeSlaa, Sean W. Nashold, Robert J. Dusek

Abstract

Shorebirds are a primary reservoir of avian influenza viruses (AIV). We conducted surveillance studies in Iceland shorebird populations for 3years, documenting high serological evidence of AIV exposure in shorebirds, primarily in Ruddy Turnstones (Arenaria interpres; seroprevalence=75%). However, little evidence of virus infection was found in these shorebird populations and only two turnstone AIVs (H2N7; H5N1) were able to be phylogenetically examined. These analyses showed that viruses from Iceland shorebirds were primarily derived from Eurasian lineage viruses, yet the H2 hemagglutinin gene segment was from a North American lineage previously detected in a gull from Iceland the previous year. The H5N1 virus was determined to be low pathogenic, however the PB2 gene was closely related to the PB2 from highly pathogenic H5N1 isolates from China. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that the turnstones were infected with at least one of these AIV while in Iceland and confirm Iceland as an important location where AIV from different continents interact and reassort, creating new virus genomes. Mounting data warrant continued surveillance for AIV in wild birds in the North Atlantic, including Canada, Greenland, and the northeast USA to determine the risks of new AI viruses and their intercontinental movement in this region.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 28 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 7%
Singapore 1 4%
Unknown 25 89%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 7 25%
Researcher 6 21%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Student > Bachelor 2 7%
Other 4 14%
Unknown 4 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 8 29%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 7 25%
Environmental Science 3 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 1 4%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 4 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 October 2014.
All research outputs
#8,527,937
of 15,794,406 outputs
Outputs from Infection, Genetics & Evolution
#725
of 2,295 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#84,040
of 211,538 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Infection, Genetics & Evolution
#13
of 48 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,794,406 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 45th percentile – i.e., 45% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,295 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 5.1. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,538 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 48 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 70% of its contemporaries.