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Urban landscapes can change virus gene flow and evolution in a fragmentation-sensitive carnivore

Overview of attention for article published in Molecular Ecology, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (85th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
21 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
11 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
54 Mendeley
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Title
Urban landscapes can change virus gene flow and evolution in a fragmentation-sensitive carnivore
Published in
Molecular Ecology, November 2017
DOI 10.1111/mec.14375
Pubmed ID
Authors

Nicholas M. Fountain-Jones, Meggan E. Craft, W. Chris Funk, Chris Kozakiewicz, Daryl R. Trumbo, Erin E. Boydston, Lisa M. Lyren, Kevin Crooks, Justin S. Lee, Sue VandeWoude, Scott Carver

Abstract

Urban expansion has widespread impacts on wildlife species globally, including the transmission and emergence of infectious diseases. However, there is almost no information about how urban landscapes shape transmission dynamics in wildlife. Using an innovative phylodynamic approach combining host and pathogen molecular data with landscape characteristics and host traits, we untangle the complex factors that drive transmission networks of Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) in bobcats (Lynx rufus). We found that the urban landscape played a significant role in shaping FIV transmission. Even though bobcats were often trapped within the urban matrix, FIV transmission events were more likely to occur in areas with more natural habitat elements. Urban fragmentation also resulted in lower rates of pathogen evolution, possibly owing to a narrower range of host genotypes in the fragmented area. Combined, our findings show that urban landscapes can have impacts on a pathogen and its evolution in a carnivore living in one of the most fragmented and urban systems in North America. The analytical approach used here can be broadly applied to other host-pathogen systems, including humans. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 21 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 54 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 54 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 30%
Researcher 10 19%
Student > Bachelor 7 13%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 7%
Student > Master 4 7%
Other 13 24%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 57%
Environmental Science 7 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 6 11%
Unspecified 4 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 6%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 21. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 June 2019.
All research outputs
#773,391
of 13,512,600 outputs
Outputs from Molecular Ecology
#428
of 4,476 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#27,073
of 275,013 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Molecular Ecology
#21
of 148 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,512,600 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 94th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,476 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.0. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,013 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 148 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.