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RNA-sequencing reveals oligodendrocyte and neuronal transcripts in microglia relevant to central nervous system disease.

Overview of attention for article published in Glia, September 2014
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  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (68th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (71st percentile)

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49 Mendeley
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Title
RNA-sequencing reveals oligodendrocyte and neuronal transcripts in microglia relevant to central nervous system disease.
Published in
Glia, September 2014
DOI 10.1002/glia.22754
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anne C Solga, Winnie W Pong, Jason Walker, Todd Wylie, Vincent Magrini, Anthony J Apicelli, Malachi Griffith, Obi L Griffith, Shinichi Kohsaka, Gregory F Wu, David L Brody, Elaine R Mardis, David H Gutmann, Solga AC, Pong WW, Walker J, Wylie T, Magrini V, Apicelli AJ, Griffith M, Griffith OL, Kohsaka S, Wu GF, Brody DL, Mardis ER, Gutmann DH

Abstract

Expression profiling of distinct central nervous system (CNS) cell populations has been employed to facilitate disease classification and to provide insights into the molecular basis of brain pathology. One important cell type implicated in a wide variety of CNS disease states is the resident brain macrophage (microglia). In these studies, microglia are often isolated from dissociated brain tissue by flow sorting procedures [fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)] or from postnatal glial cultures by mechanic isolation. Given the highly dynamic and state-dependent functions of these cells, the use of FACS or short-term culture methods may not accurately capture the biology of brain microglia. In the current study, we performed RNA-sequencing using Cx3cr1(+/GFP) labeled microglia isolated from the brainstem of 6-week-old mice to compare the transcriptomes of FACS-sorted versus laser capture microdissection (LCM). While both isolation techniques resulted in a large number of shared (common) transcripts, we identified transcripts unique to FACS-isolated and LCM-captured microglia. In particular, ∼50% of these LCM-isolated microglial transcripts represented genes typically associated with neurons and glia. While these transcripts clearly localized to microglia using complementary methods, they were not translated into protein. Following the induction of murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, increased oligodendrocyte and neuronal transcripts were detected in microglia, while only the myelin basic protein oligodendrocyte transcript was increased in microglia after traumatic brain injury. Collectively, these findings have implications for the design and interpretation of microglia transcriptome-based investigations. GLIA 2014.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 5 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 49 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Spain 1 2%
South Africa 1 2%
United Kingdom 1 2%
China 1 2%
Netherlands 1 2%
Unknown 44 90%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 18 37%
Researcher 14 29%
Student > Master 8 16%
Professor 2 4%
Student > Bachelor 2 4%
Other 5 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 27 55%
Medicine and Dentistry 7 14%
Neuroscience 6 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 8%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 4%
Other 3 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 31 October 2015.
All research outputs
#2,168,309
of 6,510,470 outputs
Outputs from Glia
#242
of 760 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#50,774
of 164,260 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Glia
#5
of 21 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 6,510,470 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 66th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 760 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.3. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 67% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 164,260 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 68% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 21 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 71% of its contemporaries.