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Behavior of bats at wind turbines

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
22 news outlets
blogs
13 blogs
policy
3 policy sources
twitter
93 tweeters
facebook
36 Facebook pages
googleplus
4 Google+ users
video
1 video uploader

Citations

dimensions_citation
81 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
322 Mendeley
citeulike
3 CiteULike
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Title
Behavior of bats at wind turbines
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, September 2014
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1406672111
Pubmed ID
Authors

Paul. M. Cryan, P. Marcos Gorresen, Cris D. Hein, Michael R. Schirmacher, Robert H. Diehl, Manuela M. Huso, David T. S. Hayman, Paul D. Fricker, Frank J. Bonaccorso, Douglas H. Johnson, Kevin Heist, David C. Dalton

Abstract

Wind turbines are causing unprecedented numbers of bat fatalities. Many fatalities involve tree-roosting bats, but reasons for this higher susceptibility remain unknown. To better understand behaviors associated with risk, we monitored bats at three experimentally manipulated wind turbines in Indiana, United States, from July 29 to October 1, 2012, using thermal cameras and other methods. We observed bats on 993 occasions and saw many behaviors, including close approaches, flight loops and dives, hovering, and chases. Most bats altered course toward turbines during observation. Based on these new observations, we tested the hypotheses that wind speed and blade rotation speed influenced the way that bats interacted with turbines. We found that bats were detected more frequently at lower wind speeds and typically approached turbines on the leeward (downwind) side. The proportion of leeward approaches increased with wind speed when blades were prevented from turning, yet decreased when blades could turn. Bats were observed more frequently at turbines on moonlit nights. Taken together, these observations suggest that bats may orient toward turbines by sensing air currents and using vision, and that air turbulence caused by fast-moving blades creates conditions that are less attractive to bats passing in close proximity. Tree bats may respond to streams of air flowing downwind from trees at night while searching for roosts, conspecifics, and nocturnal insect prey that could accumulate in such flows. Fatalities of tree bats at turbines may be the consequence of behaviors that evolved to provide selective advantages when elicited by tall trees, but are now maladaptive when elicited by wind turbines.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 93 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 322 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 4 1%
Switzerland 4 1%
Netherlands 3 <1%
Portugal 2 <1%
Romania 2 <1%
Mexico 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
Unknown 304 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 77 24%
Student > Master 50 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 48 15%
Other 39 12%
Student > Bachelor 37 11%
Other 38 12%
Unknown 33 10%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 171 53%
Environmental Science 78 24%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 9 3%
Engineering 5 2%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 3 <1%
Other 15 5%
Unknown 41 13%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 359. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 30 March 2019.
All research outputs
#40,574
of 15,642,244 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#1,045
of 85,553 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#516
of 212,097 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#23
of 913 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,642,244 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 85,553 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 28.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,097 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 913 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.