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Simvastatin in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

Overview of attention for article published in New England Journal of Medicine, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (98th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (77th percentile)

Citations

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270 Dimensions

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312 Mendeley
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Title
Simvastatin in the Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome
Published in
New England Journal of Medicine, October 2014
DOI 10.1056/nejmoa1403285
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniel F. McAuley, John G. Laffey, Cecilia M. O'Kane, Gavin D. Perkins, Brian Mullan, T. John Trinder, Paul Johnston, Philip A. Hopkins, Andrew J. Johnston, Cliona McDowell, Christine McNally

Abstract

Background Studies in animals and in vitro and phase 2 studies in humans suggest that statins may be beneficial in the treatment of the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). This study tested the hypothesis that treatment with simvastatin would improve clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. Methods In this multicenter, double-blind clinical trial, we randomly assigned (in a 1:1 ratio) patients with an onset of ARDS within the previous 48 hours to receive enteral simvastatin at a dose of 80 mg or placebo once daily for a maximum of 28 days. The primary outcome was the number of ventilator-free days to day 28. Secondary outcomes included the number of days free of nonpulmonary organ failure to day 28, mortality at 28 days, and safety. Results The study recruited 540 patients, with 259 patients assigned to simvastatin and 281 to placebo. The groups were well matched with respect to demographic and baseline physiological variables. There was no significant difference between the study groups in the mean (±SD) number of ventilator-free days (12.6±9.9 with simvastatin and 11.5±10.4 with placebo, P=0.21) or days free of nonpulmonary organ failure (19.4±11.1 and 17.8±11.7, respectively; P=0.11) or in mortality at 28 days (22.0% and 26.8%, respectively; P=0.23). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the incidence of serious adverse events related to the study drug. Conclusions Simvastatin therapy, although safe and associated with minimal adverse effects, did not improve clinical outcomes in patients with ARDS. (Funded by the U.K. National Institute for Health Research Efficacy and Mechanism Evaluation Programme and others; HARP-2 Current Controlled Trials number, ISRCTN88244364 .).

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 52 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 312 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 3 <1%
Brazil 2 <1%
Netherlands 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
South Africa 1 <1%
Belgium 1 <1%
Denmark 1 <1%
Spain 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Other 0 0%
Unknown 300 96%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 54 17%
Other 50 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 37 12%
Student > Postgraduate 25 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 22 7%
Other 70 22%
Unknown 54 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 185 59%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 14 4%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 10 3%
Nursing and Health Professions 8 3%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 7 2%
Other 19 6%
Unknown 69 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 80. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 October 2021.
All research outputs
#353,400
of 19,178,874 outputs
Outputs from New England Journal of Medicine
#5,466
of 29,109 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#4,342
of 221,413 outputs
Outputs of similar age from New England Journal of Medicine
#83
of 359 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,178,874 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 29,109 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 101.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 221,413 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 359 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 77% of its contemporaries.