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Visual pigments, oil droplets, lens, and cornea characterization in the whooping crane (Grus americana)

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Experimental Biology, January 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (73rd percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (66th percentile)

Mentioned by

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7 tweeters

Citations

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13 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Visual pigments, oil droplets, lens, and cornea characterization in the whooping crane (Grus americana)
Published in
Journal of Experimental Biology, January 2014
DOI 10.1242/jeb.108456
Pubmed ID
Authors

Megan L. Porter, Alexandra C.N. Kingston, Robert McCready, Evan G. Cameron, Christopher M. Hofmann, Lauren Suarez, Glenn H. Olsen, Thomas W. Cronin, Phyllis R. Robinson

Abstract

Vision has been investigated in many species of birds, but few studies have considered the visual systems of large birds and the particular implications of large eyes and long-life spans on visual system capabilities. To address these issues we investigated the visual system of the whooping crane, Grus americana (Gruiformes: Gruidae). G. americana (an endangered species) is one of only two North American crane species and represents a large, long-lived bird where ultraviolet sensitivity may be degraded by chromatic aberrations and entrance of ultraviolet light into the eye could be detrimental to retinal tissues. To investigate the whooping crane visual system we used microspectrophotometry to determine the absorbance spectra of retinal oil droplets and to investigate if the ocular media (i.e., the lens and cornea) absorbs UV light. In vitro expression and reconstitution was used to determine the absorbance spectra of rod and cone visual pigments. The rod visual pigments had wavelengths of peak absorbance (λmax) at 500 nm, while the cone visual pigments λmax values were determined to be 404 nm (SWS1), 450 nm (SWS2), 499 nm (RH2), and 561 nm (LWS), similar to other characterized bird visual pigment absorbance values. The oil droplet cutoff wavelength (λcut) values similarly fell within ranges recorded from other avian species: 576 nm (R-type), 522 nm (Y-type), 506 nm (P-type), and 448 nm (C-type). We confirm that G. americana has a violet-sensitive visual system, although based on the λmax of the SWS1 visual pigment (404 nm) may also have some ability for UV sensitivity.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 7 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 5%
Japan 1 3%
Unknown 35 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 32%
Researcher 9 24%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Other 2 5%
Student > Postgraduate 2 5%
Other 3 8%
Unknown 6 16%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 55%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 5 13%
Neuroscience 2 5%
Environmental Science 1 3%
Social Sciences 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 18%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 4. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 November 2014.
All research outputs
#4,916,033
of 17,521,884 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Experimental Biology
#3,012
of 7,194 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#56,087
of 217,509 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Experimental Biology
#41
of 124 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 17,521,884 research outputs across all sources so far. This one has received more attention than most of these and is in the 70th percentile.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,194 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 13.6. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 217,509 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 73% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 124 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 66% of its contemporaries.