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Ecological contingency in the effects of climatic warming on forest herb communities

Overview of attention for article published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2010
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (90th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (53rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
20 tweeters

Citations

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63 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
198 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
Title
Ecological contingency in the effects of climatic warming on forest herb communities
Published in
Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, October 2010
DOI 10.1073/pnas.1006823107
Pubmed ID
Authors

S. Harrison, E. I. Damschen, J. B. Grace

Abstract

Downscaling from the predictions of general climate models is critical to current strategies for mitigating species loss caused by climate change. A key impediment to this downscaling is that we lack a fully developed understanding of how variation in physical, biological, or land-use characteristics mediates the effects of climate change on ecological communities within regions. We analyzed change in understory herb communities over a 60-y period (1949/1951-2007/2009) in a complex montane landscape (the Siskiyou Mountains, Oregon) where mean temperatures have increased 2 °C since 1948, similar to projections for other terrestrial communities. Our 185 sites included primary and secondary-growth lower montane forests (500-1.200 m above sea level) and primary upper montane to subalpine forests (1,500-2,100 m above sea level). In lower montane forests, regardless of land-use history, we found multiple herb-community changes consistent with an effectively drier climate, including lower mean specific leaf area, lower relative cover by species of northern biogeographic affinity, and greater compositional resemblance to communities in southerly topographic positions. At higher elevations we found qualitatively different and more modest changes, including increases in herbs of northern biogeographic affinity and in forest canopy cover. Our results provide community-level validation of predicted nonlinearities in climate change effects.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 198 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 13 7%
Switzerland 4 2%
Germany 2 1%
France 2 1%
Spain 2 1%
India 2 1%
Canada 2 1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Czechia 1 <1%
Other 7 4%
Unknown 162 82%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 57 29%
Student > Ph. D. Student 53 27%
Student > Master 21 11%
Professor > Associate Professor 15 8%
Student > Bachelor 13 7%
Other 39 20%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 124 63%
Environmental Science 48 24%
Unspecified 13 7%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 7 4%
Social Sciences 3 2%
Other 3 2%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 13. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 05 May 2018.
All research outputs
#1,093,757
of 12,892,002 outputs
Outputs from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#16,559
of 78,951 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#21,007
of 211,465 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
#421
of 914 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,892,002 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 78,951 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 23.0. This one has done well, scoring higher than 79% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 211,465 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 914 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.