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Phylogenetic analyses reveal that Schellackia parasites (Apicomplexa) detected in American lizards are closely related to the genus Lankesterella: is the range of Schellackia restricted to the Old…

Overview of attention for article published in Parasites & Vectors, October 2017
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Title
Phylogenetic analyses reveal that Schellackia parasites (Apicomplexa) detected in American lizards are closely related to the genus Lankesterella: is the range of Schellackia restricted to the Old World?
Published in
Parasites & Vectors, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s13071-017-2405-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Rodrigo Megía-Palma, Javier Martínez, Dhanashree Paranjpe, Verónica D’Amico, Rocío Aguilar, María Gabriela Palacios, Robert Cooper, Francisco Ferri-Yáñez, Barry Sinervo, Santiago Merino

Abstract

Species of Schellackia Reichenow, 1919 have been described from the blood of reptiles distributed worldwide. Recently, Schellackia spp. detected in European and Asian lizards have been molecularly characterised. However, parasites detected in American lizard hosts remain uncharacterised. Thus, phylogenetic affinities between the Old and New World parasite species are unknown. In the present study, we characterised morphologically and molecularly the hemococcidian parasites (sporozoites) that infect three lizard hosts from North America and two from South America. In total, we generated 12 new 18S rRNA gene sequences of hemococcidian parasites infecting New World lizard hosts. By the microscopic examination of the smears we identified Schellackia golvani Rogier & Landau, 1975 (ex Anolis carolinensis Voigt) and Schellackia occidentalis Bonorris & Ball, 1955 (ex Uta stansburiana Baird & Girard and Sceloporus occidentalis Baird & Girard) in some samples, but the phylogenetic analysis indicated that all 18S rDNA sequences are distant from Schellackia species found in Old World lizards. In fact, the hemococcidian parasites detected in the New World lizards (including S. occidentalis and S. golvani) were closely related to the genus Lankesterella Labbé, 1899. Consequently, we suggest these two species to be included within the genus Lankesterella. Life history traits of hemococcidian parasites such as the type of host blood cells infected, host species or number of refractile bodies are not valid diagnostic characteristics to differentiate the parasites between the genera Schellackia and Lankesterella. Indeed, lankesterellid parasites with a different number of refractile bodies had a close phylogenetic origin. Based on the phylogenetic results we provide a systematic revision of the North American hemococcidians. Our recommendation is to include the species formerly described in the genus Schellackia that infect American lizards into Lankesterella (Lankesterellidae) as Lankesterella golvani (Rogier & Landau, 1975) n. comb and L. occidentalis (Bonorris & Ball, 1955) n. comb.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 18 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 18 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Professor 5 28%
Researcher 4 22%
Student > Doctoral Student 2 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 1 6%
Student > Master 1 6%
Other 2 11%
Unknown 3 17%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 39%
Environmental Science 4 22%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 11%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 6%
Unknown 4 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,519,686
of 13,044,924 outputs
Outputs from Parasites & Vectors
#1,617
of 3,448 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#134,089
of 274,399 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Parasites & Vectors
#15
of 29 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,044,924 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 3,448 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.4. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 29 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.