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Single-molecule study of oxidative enzymatic deconstruction of cellulose

Overview of attention for article published in Nature Communications, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (96th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
1 blog
twitter
12 tweeters

Citations

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50 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
122 Mendeley
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Title
Single-molecule study of oxidative enzymatic deconstruction of cellulose
Published in
Nature Communications, October 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41467-017-01028-y
Pubmed ID
Authors

Manuel Eibinger, Jürgen Sattelkow, Thomas Ganner, Harald Plank, Bernd Nidetzky

Abstract

LPMO (lytic polysaccharide monooxygenase) represents a unique paradigm of cellulosic biomass degradation by an oxidative mechanism. Understanding the role of LPMO in deconstructing crystalline cellulose is fundamental to the enzyme's biological function and will help to specify the use of LPMO in biorefinery applications. Here we show with real-time atomic force microscopy that C1 and C4 oxidizing types of LPMO from Neurospora crassa (NcLPMO9F, NcLPMO9C) bind to nanocrystalline cellulose with high preference for the very same substrate surfaces that are also used by a processive cellulase (Trichoderma reesei CBH I) to move along during hydrolytic cellulose degradation. The bound LPMOs, however, are immobile during their adsorbed residence time ( ~ 1.0 min for NcLPMO9F) on cellulose. Treatment with LPMO resulted in fibrillation of crystalline cellulose and strongly ( ≥ 2-fold) enhanced the cellulase adsorption. It also increased enzyme turnover on the cellulose surface, thus boosting the hydrolytic conversion.Understanding the role of enzymes in biomass depolymerization is essential for the development of more efficient biorefineries. Here, the authors show by atomic force microscopy the real-time mechanism of cellulose deconstruction by lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 12 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 122 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 122 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 30 25%
Researcher 22 18%
Student > Master 20 16%
Student > Bachelor 12 10%
Other 6 5%
Other 16 13%
Unknown 16 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 38 31%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 17%
Chemistry 14 11%
Physics and Astronomy 7 6%
Chemical Engineering 4 3%
Other 9 7%
Unknown 29 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 74. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 January 2018.
All research outputs
#267,724
of 14,678,107 outputs
Outputs from Nature Communications
#4,857
of 27,662 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#9,786
of 276,778 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Nature Communications
#23
of 265 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 14,678,107 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 27,662 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 48.3. This one has done well, scoring higher than 82% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,778 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 96% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 265 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.