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Hematological indices of injury to lightly oiled birds from the deepwater horizon oil spill

Overview of attention for article published in Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#15 of 4,600)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
11 news outlets
twitter
37 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

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8 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
29 Mendeley
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Title
Hematological indices of injury to lightly oiled birds from the deepwater horizon oil spill
Published in
Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry, October 2017
DOI 10.1002/etc.3983
Pubmed ID
Authors

Fallon, Jesse A., Smith, Eric P., Schoch, Nina, Paruk, James D., Adams, Evan A., Evers, David C., Jodice, Patrick G.R., Perkins, Christopher, Schulte, Shiloh, Hopkins, William A., Jesse A. Fallon, Eric P. Smith, Nina Schoch, James D. Paruk, Evan A. Adams, David C. Evers, Patrick G.R. Jodice, Christopher Perkins, Shiloh Schulte, William A. Hopkins

Abstract

Avian mortality events are common following large-scale oil spills. However, the sublethal effects of oil on birds exposed to light external oiling are not clearly understood. We found that American oystercatchers (area of potential impact n = 42, reference n = 21), black skimmers (area of potential impact n = 121, reference n = 88), brown pelicans (area of potential impact n = 91, reference n = 48), and great egrets (area of potential impact n = 57, reference n = 47) captured between 20 June 2010 and 23 February 2011 following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill experienced oxidative injury to erythrocytes, had decreased volume of circulating erythrocytes, and showed evidence of a regenerative hematological response in the form of increased reticulocytes compared with reference populations. Erythrocytic inclusions consistent with Heinz bodies were present almost exclusively in birds from sites impacted with oil, a finding pathognomonic for oxidative injury to erythrocytes. Average packed cell volumes were 4 to 19% lower and average reticulocyte counts were 27 to 40% higher in birds with visible external oil than birds from reference sites. These findings provide evidence that small amounts of external oil exposure are associated with hemolytic anemia. Furthermore, we found that some birds captured from the area impacted by the spill but with no visible oiling also had erythrocytic inclusion bodies, increased reticulocytes, and reduced packed cell volumes when compared with birds from reference sites. Thus, birds suffered hematologic injury despite no visible oil at the time of capture. Together, these findings suggest that adverse effects of oil spills on birds may be more widespread than estimates based on avian mortality or severe visible oiling. Environ Toxicol Chem 2017;9999:1-11. © 2017 SETAC.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 37 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 29 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 29 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Master 4 14%
Other 3 10%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 3 10%
Other 5 17%
Unknown 6 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 9 31%
Environmental Science 8 28%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 7%
Medicine and Dentistry 1 3%
Chemistry 1 3%
Other 1 3%
Unknown 7 24%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 106. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 20 February 2018.
All research outputs
#200,830
of 15,934,748 outputs
Outputs from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#15
of 4,600 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,727
of 281,982 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry
#1
of 91 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,934,748 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,600 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 281,982 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 91 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.