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Self-management strategies used by head and neck cancer survivors following completion of primary treatment: A directed content analysis

Overview of attention for article published in Psycho-Oncology, May 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (53rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (56th percentile)

Mentioned by

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2 tweeters

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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45 Mendeley
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Title
Self-management strategies used by head and neck cancer survivors following completion of primary treatment: A directed content analysis
Published in
Psycho-Oncology, May 2017
DOI 10.1002/pon.4447
Pubmed ID
Authors

Simon Dunne, Orla Mooney, Laura Coffey, Linda Sharp, Aileen Timmons, Deirdre Desmond, Rachael Gooberman-Hill, Eleanor O'Sullivan, Ivan Keogh, Conrad Timon, Pamela Gallagher

Abstract

Head & Neck Cancer (HNC) survivors encounter unique challenges following treatment. This study aimed to identify self-management strategies that HNC survivors use to overcome these post-treatment challenges. Twenty-seven individuals from four designated cancer centres in Ireland were interviewed about self-management strategies that helped them overcome challenges following HNC treatment. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed and analysed using directed content analysis. Twenty self-management strategy types (encompassing 77 specific strategies) were identified. The most frequently used self-management strategy types were Self-sustaining (used by 26 survivors), Self-motivating (n = 25) and Proactive problem solving (n = 25). The most frequently used specific strategies were adaptive approaches to ongoing physical consequences of HNC and its treatment (n = 24), customizing dietary practices (n = 24) and maintaining a positive outlook (n = 22). The study identified strategies that helped HNC survivors to self-manage post-treatment challenges. This information could inform the design/development of self-management interventions tailored towards HNC survivors.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 2 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 45 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 45 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 7 16%
Researcher 6 13%
Student > Master 5 11%
Professor 3 7%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 7%
Other 6 13%
Unknown 15 33%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 11 24%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 11%
Social Sciences 5 11%
Business, Management and Accounting 4 9%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 4%
Other 2 4%
Unknown 16 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 16 April 2018.
All research outputs
#7,105,489
of 12,808,036 outputs
Outputs from Psycho-Oncology
#950
of 1,599 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#123,037
of 273,834 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Psycho-Oncology
#31
of 74 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,808,036 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 43rd percentile – i.e., 43% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,599 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.7. This one is in the 38th percentile – i.e., 38% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 273,834 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 74 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its contemporaries.