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Responses of low and high compression during recovery after repeated sprint training in well-trained handball players

Overview of attention for article published in European Journal of Sport Science, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (78th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

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10 tweeters
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3 Facebook pages

Citations

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1 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
36 Mendeley
Title
Responses of low and high compression during recovery after repeated sprint training in well-trained handball players
Published in
European Journal of Sport Science, October 2017
DOI 10.1080/17461391.2017.1380707
Pubmed ID
Authors

Christoph Zinner, Maximilian Pelka, Alexander Ferrauti, Tim Meyer, Mark Pfeiffer, Billy Sperlich

Abstract

The aim of the study was to investigate the effects of wearing various levels of compression following repeated and exhausting sprint exercise on variables related to recovery. Twelve well-trained handball players performed three sessions of repeated and exhausting sprint exercise (30 × 30m). Directly after each session the participants wore tights extending from below the hip to the foot with either 0, 10, or 25 mm Hg of compression onto the thigh and calf muscles. 48 h after the training session all participants performed 5 × 30m sprints and counter movement jumps. Before, directly after, 24 h, and 48 h after the training session venous blood samples were drawn for the determination of creatine kinase (CK), urea, C-reactive protein (CRP). At the same time points, subjective ratings of the Acute Recovery and Stress Scale (ARSS) questionnaires were obtained. The results for plasma concentrations of CK and urea showed 'likely' to 'very, very likely' beneficial effects for compression garments exerting 10 mm Hg of compression (p = 0.06-1.0). With regard to sprint and jump performance no differences were evident between 0, 10, and 25 mm Hg (p = 0.07-1.0). In addition, subjective scores from the ARSS did not differ between conditions over time (p > 0.05). We conclude that the application of 10 mm Hg leg compression compared to 0 and 25 mm Hg of compression during 48 h of recovery from repeated and exhausting sprints lowered the plasma concentrations of CK and urea with no improvements in recovery for performance.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 10 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 36 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 36 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Unspecified 10 28%
Student > Bachelor 7 19%
Student > Ph. D. Student 6 17%
Student > Master 4 11%
Researcher 4 11%
Other 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Sports and Recreations 13 36%
Unspecified 11 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 6 17%
Psychology 2 6%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 6%
Other 2 6%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 8. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 November 2019.
All research outputs
#2,205,816
of 13,866,619 outputs
Outputs from European Journal of Sport Science
#512
of 1,197 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#60,120
of 276,577 outputs
Outputs of similar age from European Journal of Sport Science
#18
of 35 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,866,619 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 84th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,197 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.0. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 56% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 276,577 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 78% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 35 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.