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Stable-isotope probing and metagenomics reveal predation by protozoa drives E. coli removal in slow sand filters

Overview of attention for article published in ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Good Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (69th percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
19 tweeters

Citations

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32 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
115 Mendeley
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Title
Stable-isotope probing and metagenomics reveal predation by protozoa drives E. coli removal in slow sand filters
Published in
ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology, October 2014
DOI 10.1038/ismej.2014.175
Pubmed ID
Authors

Sarah-Jane Haig, Melanie Schirmer, Rosalinda D'Amore, Joseph Gibbs, Robert L Davies, Gavin Collins, Christopher Quince

Abstract

Stable-isotope probing and metagenomics were applied to study samples taken from laboratory-scale slow sand filters 0.5, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h after challenging with (13)C-labelled Escherichia coli to determine the mechanisms and organisms responsible for coliform removal. Before spiking, the filters had been continuously operated for 7 weeks using water from the River Kelvin, Glasgow as their influent source. Direct counts and quantitative PCR assays revealed a clear predator-prey response between protozoa and E. coli. The importance of top-down trophic-interactions was confirmed by metagenomic analysis, identifying several protozoan and viral species connected to E. coli attrition, with protozoan grazing responsible for the majority of the removal. In addition to top-down mechanisms, indirect mechanisms, such as algal reactive oxygen species-induced lysis, and mutualistic interactions between algae and fungi, were also associated with coliform removal. The findings significantly further our understanding of the processes and trophic interactions underpinning E. coli removal. This study provides an example for similar studies, and the opportunity to better understand, manage and enhance E. coli removal by allowing the creation of more complex trophic interaction models.The ISME Journal advance online publication, 3 October 2014; doi:10.1038/ismej.2014.175.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 19 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 115 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Brazil 2 2%
Germany 1 <1%
Ireland 1 <1%
Sweden 1 <1%
Canada 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Unknown 108 94%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 32 28%
Researcher 17 15%
Student > Master 15 13%
Student > Bachelor 14 12%
Student > Doctoral Student 8 7%
Other 14 12%
Unknown 15 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 27%
Environmental Science 23 20%
Engineering 14 12%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 11 10%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 3%
Other 6 5%
Unknown 26 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 10. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 November 2015.
All research outputs
#1,945,686
of 15,660,138 outputs
Outputs from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#1,122
of 2,390 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#28,864
of 212,307 outputs
Outputs of similar age from ISME Journal: Multidisciplinary Journal of Microbial Ecology
#16
of 52 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,660,138 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done well and is in the 87th percentile: it's in the top 25% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,390 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 17.4. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 53% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 212,307 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 52 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 69% of its contemporaries.