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Determinants of Reduced Genetic Capacity for Butyrate Synthesis by the Gut Microbiome in Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of Crohn's and Colitis, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (88th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (81st percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
20 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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43 Dimensions

Readers on

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76 Mendeley
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Title
Determinants of Reduced Genetic Capacity for Butyrate Synthesis by the Gut Microbiome in Crohn’s Disease and Ulcerative Colitis
Published in
Journal of Crohn's and Colitis, October 2017
DOI 10.1093/ecco-jcc/jjx137
Pubmed ID
Authors

Emilio J Laserna-Mendieta, Adam G Clooney, Julián F Carretero-Gomez, Carthage Moran, Donal Sheehan, James A Nolan, Colin Hill, Cormac G M Gahan, Susan A Joyce, Fergus Shanahan, Marcus J Claesson

Abstract

Alterations in short chain fatty acid metabolism, particularly butyrate, have been reported in inflammatory bowel disease, but results have been conflicting because of small study numbers and failure to distinguish disease type, activity or other variables such as diet. We performed a comparative assessment of the capacity of the microbiota for butyrate synthesis, by quantifying butyryl-CoA:acetate CoA-transferase [BCoAT] gene content in stool from patients with Crohn's disease [CD; n = 71], ulcerative colitis [UC; n = 58] and controls [n = 75], and determined whether it was related to active vs inactive inflammation, microbial diversity, and composition and/or dietary habits. BCoAT gene content was quantified by quantitative polymerase chain reaction [qPCR]. Disease activity was assessed clinically and faecal calprotectin concentration measured. Microbial composition was determined by sequencing 16S rRNA gene. Dietary data were collected using an established food frequency questionnaire. Reduced butyrate-synthetic capacity was found in patients with active and inactive CD [p < 0.001 and p < 0.01, respectively], but only in active UC [p < 0.05]. In CD, low BCoAT gene content was associated with ileal location, stenotic behaviour, increased inflammation, lower microbial diversity, greater microbiota compositional change, and decreased butyrogenic taxa. Reduced BCoAT gene content in patients with CD was linked with a different regimen characterised by lower dietary fibre. Reduced butyrate-synthetic capacity of the microbiota is more evident in CD than UC and may relate to reduced fibre intake. The results suggest that simple replacement of butyrate per se may be therapeutically inadequate, whereas manipulation of microbial synthesis, perhaps by dietary means, may be more appropriate.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 20 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 76 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 76 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 14 18%
Student > Bachelor 10 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 12%
Researcher 8 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 5%
Other 9 12%
Unknown 22 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 13 17%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 8 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 7 9%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 7%
Other 5 7%
Unknown 27 36%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 18. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 September 2018.
All research outputs
#890,148
of 13,477,526 outputs
Outputs from Journal of Crohn's and Colitis
#70
of 1,042 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#30,360
of 275,112 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of Crohn's and Colitis
#5
of 27 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,477,526 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 93rd percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,042 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,112 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 88% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 27 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done well, scoring higher than 81% of its contemporaries.