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Viewpoints on driving of individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder.

Overview of attention for article published in Developmental Neurorehabilitation, October 2014
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Mentioned by

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3 tweeters
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2 Facebook pages

Citations

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15 Dimensions

Readers on

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26 Mendeley
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Title
Viewpoints on driving of individuals with and without autism spectrum disorder.
Published in
Developmental Neurorehabilitation, October 2014
DOI 10.3109/17518423.2014.964377
Pubmed ID
Authors

Derserri Yan-Ting Chee, Hoe Chung-Yeung Lee, Marita Falkmer, Tania Barnett, Olov Falkmer, Jessica Siljehav, Torbjörn Falkmer, Hoe Chung-yeung Lee

Abstract

Abstract Objective: Understanding the viewpoints of drivers with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is crucial in the development of mobility support and driver training that is responsive to their needs. Methods: Fifty young adults with ASD and fifty seven typically developed adults participated in the study to form a contrasting group. Q-methodology was used to understand viewpoints on driving as a main mode of transportation. Data were analysed using a PQ by-person varimax rotation factor analysis. Results: Although some ASD participants perceived themselves as confident and independent drivers, others preferred other modes of transportation such as public transport and walking. Anxiety was also found to be a barrier to driving. The contrast group revealed consistent viewpoints on their driving ability. They preferred driving as their main mode of transportation and believed that they were competent, safe and independent drivers. Conclusion: These results are important in the planning of transport policies and driver training for individuals with ASD. Driver training manuals can be developed to address anxiety issues, hazard perception and navigation problems in the ASD population. Their use of public transport could be further facilitated through more inclusive transport policies.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 26 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 1 4%
Netherlands 1 4%
Unknown 24 92%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 5 19%
Student > Bachelor 4 15%
Student > Doctoral Student 3 12%
Researcher 3 12%
Student > Postgraduate 2 8%
Other 9 35%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 10 38%
Social Sciences 3 12%
Nursing and Health Professions 3 12%
Arts and Humanities 2 8%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 8%
Other 6 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 06 October 2017.
All research outputs
#7,103,653
of 11,877,834 outputs
Outputs from Developmental Neurorehabilitation
#147
of 267 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#98,333
of 208,859 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Developmental Neurorehabilitation
#3
of 4 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 11,877,834 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 267 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 3.5. This one is in the 41st percentile – i.e., 41% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 208,859 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 4 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one.