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Spring fasting behavior in a marine apex predator provides an index of ecosystem productivity

Overview of attention for article published in Global Change Biology, November 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (91st percentile)

Mentioned by

news
8 news outlets
blogs
5 blogs
twitter
11 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
36 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
62 Mendeley
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Title
Spring fasting behavior in a marine apex predator provides an index of ecosystem productivity
Published in
Global Change Biology, November 2017
DOI 10.1111/gcb.13933
Pubmed ID
Authors

Karyn D. Rode, Ryan R. Wilson, David C. Douglas, Vanessa Muhlenbruch, Todd C. Atwood, Eric V. Regehr, Evan S. Richardson, Nicholas W. Pilfold, Andrew E. Derocher, George M. Durner, Ian Stirling, Steven C. Amstrup, Michelle St. Martin, Anthony M. Pagano, Kristin Simac

Abstract

The effects of declining Arctic sea ice on local ecosystem productivity are not well understood but have been shown to vary inter-specifically, spatially, and temporally. Because marine mammals occupy upper trophic-levels in Arctic food webs, they may be useful indicators for understanding variation in ecosystem productivity. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) are apex predators that primarily consume benthic and pelagic-feeding ice-associated seals. As such, their productivity integrates sea ice conditions and the ecosystem supporting them. Declining sea ice availability has been linked to negative population effects for polar bears but does not fully explain observed population changes. We examined relationships between spring foraging success of polar bears and sea ice conditions, prey productivity, and general patterns of ecosystem productivity in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas. Fasting status (≥ 7 days) was estimated using serum urea and creatinine levels of 1,448 samples collected from 1,177 adult and subadult bears across three subpopulations. Fasting increased in the Beaufort Sea between 1983-1999 and 2000-2016 and was related to an index of ringed seal body condition. This change was concurrent with declines in body condition of polar bears and observed changes in the diet, condition and/or reproduction of four other vertebrate consumers within the food chain. In contrast, fasting declined in Chukchi Sea polar bears between periods and was less common than in the two Beaufort Sea subpopulations consistent with studies demonstrating higher primary productivity and maintenance or improved body condition in polar bears, ringed seals, and bearded seals despite recent sea ice loss in this region. Consistency between regional and temporal variation in spring polar bear fasting and food web productivity suggest that polar bears may be a useful indicator species. Further, our results suggest that spatial and temporal ecological variation is important in affecting upper trophic level productivity in these marine ecosystems. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 11 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 62 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 62 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 11 18%
Student > Bachelor 11 18%
Researcher 10 16%
Student > Master 6 10%
Other 3 5%
Other 3 5%
Unknown 18 29%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 20 32%
Environmental Science 14 23%
Medicine and Dentistry 3 5%
Business, Management and Accounting 1 2%
Mathematics 1 2%
Other 4 6%
Unknown 19 31%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 94. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 03 January 2022.
All research outputs
#309,669
of 19,934,082 outputs
Outputs from Global Change Biology
#333
of 5,172 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#8,179
of 295,125 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Global Change Biology
#13
of 135 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 19,934,082 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 98th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 5,172 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 30.5. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 295,125 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 135 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its contemporaries.