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Acute and late urinary toxicity following radiation in men with an intact prostate gland or after a radical prostatectomy: A secondary analysis of RTOG 94-08 and 96-01

Overview of attention for article published in Urologic Oncology, October 2016
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Title
Acute and late urinary toxicity following radiation in men with an intact prostate gland or after a radical prostatectomy: A secondary analysis of RTOG 94-08 and 96-01
Published in
Urologic Oncology, October 2016
DOI 10.1016/j.urolonc.2016.04.015
Pubmed ID
Authors

Raymond H. Mak, Daniel Hunt, Jason A. Efstathiou, Niall M. Heney, Christopher U. Jones, Himu R. Lukka, Jean-Paul Bahary, Malti Patel, Alexander Balogh, Abdenour Nabid, Mark H. Leibenhaut, Daniel A. Hamstra, Kevin S. Roof, Robert Jeffrey Lee, Elizabeth M. Gore, Howard M. Sandler, William U. Shipley

Abstract

To estimate the contribution of the prostate gland and prostatic urethral inflammation to urinary symptoms after radiation therapy for prostate cancer, we performed a secondary analysis of urinary toxicity after primary radiation to an intact prostate vs. postprostatectomy radiation to the prostatic fossa in protocols RTOG 94-08 and 96-01, respectively. Patients randomized to the radiation-alone arms (without hormone therapy) of the 2 trials were evaluated, including 104 men receiving primary prostate radiation to 68.4Gy on RTOG 94-08 and 371 men receiving 64.8Gy to the prostatic fossa on RTOG 96-01. Acute and late urinary toxicity were scored prospectively by RTOG scales. Chi-square test/logistic regression and cumulative incidence approach/Fine-Gray regression model were used for analyses of acute and late toxicity, respectively. Grade≥2 acute urinary toxicity was significantly higher after primary prostatic radiation compared with postprostatectomy radiation (30.8% vs. 14.0%; P<0.001), but acute grade≥3 toxicity did not differ (3.8% vs. 2.7%; P = 0.54). After adjusting for age, primary radiation resulted in significantly higher grade≥2 acute urinary toxicity (odds ratio = 3.72; 95% CI: 1.65-8.37; P = 0.02). With median follow-up of 7.1 years, late urinary toxicity was not significantly different with primary vs. postprostatectomy radiation (5-year grade≥2: 16.7% vs. 18.3%; P = 0.65; grade≥3: 6.0% vs. 3.3%; P = 0.24). Primary radiation to an intact prostate resulted in higher grade≥2 acute urinary toxicity than radiation to the prostatic fossa, with no difference in late urinary toxicity. Thus, a proportion of acute urinary toxicity in men with an intact prostate may be attributable to inflammation of the prostatic gland or urethra.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 30 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 30 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Postgraduate 6 20%
Researcher 5 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 4 13%
Other 3 10%
Professor > Associate Professor 2 7%
Other 6 20%
Unknown 4 13%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 12 40%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 7%
Nursing and Health Professions 2 7%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 1 3%
Other 3 10%
Unknown 8 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 13 November 2018.
All research outputs
#10,969,400
of 13,816,277 outputs
Outputs from Urologic Oncology
#728
of 1,006 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#203,226
of 276,952 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Urologic Oncology
#30
of 46 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,816,277 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,006 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.1. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
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We're also able to compare this research output to 46 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 23rd percentile – i.e., 23% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.