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Divergence at the edges: peripatric isolation in the montane spiny throated reed frog complex

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Evolutionary Biology, July 2015
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)

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1 Wikipedia page

Citations

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58 Mendeley
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Title
Divergence at the edges: peripatric isolation in the montane spiny throated reed frog complex
Published in
BMC Evolutionary Biology, July 2015
DOI 10.1186/s12862-015-0384-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucinda P. Lawson, John M. Bates, Michele Menegon, Simon P. Loader

Abstract

Peripatric speciation and peripheral isolation have uncertain importance in species accumulation, and are largely overshadowed by assumed dominance of allopatric modes of speciation. Understanding the role of different speciation mechanisms within biodiversity hotspots is central to understanding the generation of biological diversity. Here, we use a phylogeographic analysis of the spiny-throated reed frogs and examine sister pairings with unbalanced current distributional ranges for characteristics of peripatric speciation. We further investigate whether forest/grassland mosaic adapted species are more likely created through peripatric speciation due to instability of this habitat type. We reconstructed a multi-locus molecular phylogeny of spiny-throated reed frogs which we then combined with comparative morphologic data to delimit species and analyze historical demographic change; identifying three new species. Three potential peripatric speciation events were identified along with one case of allopatric speciation. Peripatric speciation is supported through uneven potential and realized distributions and uneven population size estimates based on field collections. An associated climate shift was observed in most potentially peripatric splits. Morphological variation was highest in sexually dimorphic traits such as body size and gular shape, but this variation was not limited to peripatric species pairs as hypothesized. The potentially allopatric species pair showed no niche shifts and equivalent effective population sizes, ruling out peripatry in that speciation event. Two major ecological niche shifts were recovered within this radiation, possibly as adaptations to occupy areas of grassland that became more prevalent in the last 5 million years. Restricted and fluctuating grassland mosaics within forests might promote peripatric speciation in the Eastern Arc Biodiversity Hotspot (EABH). In our case study, peripatric speciation appears to be an important driver of diversity within the EABH biodiversity hotspot, implying it could be a significant speciation mechanism in highly fragmented ecosystems. Extensive peripatric speciation in this montane archipelago may explain the abundance of discrete lineages within the limited area of the EABH, as inferred in remote island archipelagos. Future phylogenetic studies incorporating demographic and spatial analyses will clarify the role of peripatric speciation in creating biodiversity hotspots.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 58 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
France 1 2%
Uruguay 1 2%
Cuba 1 2%
Brazil 1 2%
United States 1 2%
Unknown 53 91%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 13 22%
Student > Bachelor 10 17%
Student > Master 8 14%
Researcher 7 12%
Student > Postgraduate 3 5%
Other 9 16%
Unknown 8 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 31 53%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 9 16%
Environmental Science 3 5%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 2 3%
Linguistics 1 2%
Other 5 9%
Unknown 7 12%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 May 2018.
All research outputs
#3,801,224
of 12,923,750 outputs
Outputs from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1,205
of 2,430 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#97,155
of 275,176 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Evolutionary Biology
#1
of 1 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,923,750 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,430 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 10.1. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 275,176 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 1 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has scored higher than all of them