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Does Fire Influence the Landscape-Scale Distribution of an Invasive Mesopredator?

Overview of attention for article published in PLoS ONE, October 2014
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  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (90th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
25 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages

Citations

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5 Dimensions

Readers on

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38 Mendeley
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Title
Does Fire Influence the Landscape-Scale Distribution of an Invasive Mesopredator?
Published in
PLoS ONE, October 2014
DOI 10.1371/journal.pone.0107862
Pubmed ID
Authors

Catherine J. Payne, Euan G. Ritchie, Luke T. Kelly, Dale G. Nimmo

Abstract

Predation and fire shape the structure and function of ecosystems globally. However, studies exploring interactions between these two processes are rare, especially at large spatial scales. This knowledge gap is significant not only for ecological theory, but also in an applied context, because it limits the ability of landscape managers to predict the outcomes of manipulating fire and predators. We examined the influence of fire on the occurrence of an introduced and widespread mesopredator, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), in semi-arid Australia. We used two extensive and complimentary datasets collected at two spatial scales. At the landscape-scale, we surveyed red foxes using sand-plots within 28 study landscapes - which incorporated variation in the diversity and proportional extent of fire-age classes - located across a 104 000 km2 study area. At the site-scale, we surveyed red foxes using camera traps at 108 sites stratified along a century-long post-fire chronosequence (0-105 years) within a 6630 km2 study area. Red foxes were widespread both at the landscape and site-scale. Fire did not influence fox distribution at either spatial scale, nor did other environmental variables that we measured. Our results show that red foxes exploit a broad range of environmental conditions within semi-arid Australia. The presence of red foxes throughout much of the landscape is likely to have significant implications for native fauna, particularly in recently burnt habitats where reduced cover may increase prey species' predation risk.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 25 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 38 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Australia 4 11%
Brazil 1 3%
United States 1 3%
Unknown 32 84%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 15 39%
Researcher 5 13%
Student > Bachelor 4 11%
Student > Master 4 11%
Other 2 5%
Other 8 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Environmental Science 16 42%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 15 39%
Unspecified 3 8%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 5%
Immunology and Microbiology 1 3%
Other 1 3%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 31. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 February 2018.
All research outputs
#455,933
of 12,388,147 outputs
Outputs from PLoS ONE
#8,790
of 136,278 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#10,003
of 216,516 outputs
Outputs of similar age from PLoS ONE
#276
of 3,017 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,388,147 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 96th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 136,278 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.7. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 216,516 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 3,017 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 90% of its contemporaries.