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Differential visceral pain sensitivity and colonic morphology in four common laboratory rat strains

Overview of attention for article published in Experimental Physiology, December 2013
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Title
Differential visceral pain sensitivity and colonic morphology in four common laboratory rat strains
Published in
Experimental Physiology, December 2013
DOI 10.1113/expphysiol.2013.076109
Pubmed ID
Authors

Dervla O'Malley, Marcela Julio-Pieper, Siobhain M. O'Mahony, Timothy G. Dinan, John F. Cryan

Abstract

What is the central question of this study? Does stress sensitivity and susceptibility to inflammation innate to certain rat strains make them vulnerable to bowel dysfunction? What is the main finding and its importance? Of four different rat strains, the Lewis rat, which displays both susceptibility to gastrointestinal inflammation and sensitivity to stress, exhibits the most aberrant gastrointestinal morphology and visceral pain sensitivity. Given the similarities to human functional bowel disorders, such as irritable bowel syndrome, this may make it a good model of this disease. Irritable bowel syndrome is a common, debilitating gastrointestinal (GI) disorder characterized by episodic exacerbations of symptoms such as abdominal pain, bloating and altered bowel habit. Contributory factors for the development of irritable bowel syndrome include genetics, childhood trauma and prior GI infection leading to chronic low-grade inflammation or immune activation. Additional considerations in comprehending the chronic relapsing pattern that typifies irritable bowel syndrome symptoms are the effects of both psychosocial and infection-related stresses. Background stress and immune profiles can influence gut permeability and visceral pain sensitivity. This study examined whether innate susceptibility to inflammation and stress sensitivity in four rat strains is associated with bowel dysfunction. The pain threshold to colorectal distension was assessed in Lewis, Fischer (F344) and spontaneously hypertensive rats and compared with Sprague-Dawley control animals. Colons were subsequently excised and morphologically assessed for total length, goblet cell hyperplasia and muscle and mucosal thickness. Lewis rats displayed visceral hypersensitivity compared with other strains. At a morphological level, the gastrointestinal tract from these rats displayed mucosal goblet cell hyperplasia and alterations in muscle layer thickness. The Lewis rat strain, which is reported to have increased susceptibility to GI inflammation in addition to stress sensitivity, had the most prominent features of physiological and morphological GI dysfunction. These data support the hypothesis that background strain is a key factor in the development and exacerbation of bowel dysfunction in rodent models.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profile of 1 tweeter who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Mexico 1 4%
Ireland 1 4%
Unknown 25 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 5 19%
Student > Master 5 19%
Student > Postgraduate 3 11%
Student > Ph. D. Student 3 11%
Lecturer 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 6 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 6 22%
Psychology 4 15%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 3 11%
Veterinary Science and Veterinary Medicine 2 7%
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 1 4%
Other 4 15%
Unknown 7 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 11 October 2014.
All research outputs
#18,380,628
of 22,766,595 outputs
Outputs from Experimental Physiology
#1,926
of 2,163 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#232,027
of 307,630 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Experimental Physiology
#15
of 25 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,766,595 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 2,163 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 11.3. This one is in the 6th percentile – i.e., 6% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 307,630 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 13th percentile – i.e., 13% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 25 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 20th percentile – i.e., 20% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.