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Depression and mortality in a longitudinal study: 1952–2011

Overview of attention for article published in Canadian Medical Association Journal, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#26 of 4,835)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (98th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
48 news outlets
twitter
46 tweeters
facebook
2 Facebook pages
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
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Title
Depression and mortality in a longitudinal study: 1952–2011
Published in
Canadian Medical Association Journal, October 2017
DOI 10.1503/cmaj.170125
Pubmed ID
Authors

Stephen E. Gilman, Ewa Sucha, Mila Kingsbury, Nicholas J. Horton, Jane M. Murphy, Ian Colman

Abstract

Many studies have shown that depression increases mortality risk. We aimed to investigate the duration of time over which depression is associated with increased risk of mortality, secular trends in the association between depression and mortality, and sex differences in the association between depression and mortality. We conducted a cohort study of 3410 adults enrolled in 3 representative samples of a county in Atlantic Canada in 1952 (n = 1003), 1970 (n = 1203) or 1992 (n = 1402) (the Stirling County Study). Depression was measured using a diagnostic algorithm based on the presence of depressed mood and associated symptoms, duration of more than 1 month, and substantial impairment. Vital status of participants through 2011 was determined using probabilistic linkages to the Canadian Mortality Database. Depression was associated with a heightened risk of mortality among men during the 3 time periods of the study, with hazard ratios (HRs) of 2.90 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.69-4.98) between 1952 and 1967, 1.97 (CI 1.34-2.89) between 1968 and 1990, and 1.52 (CI 1.09-2.13) between 1991 and 2011. Elevated risk of mortality was noted among women only between 1990 and 2011 (HR = 1.51; CI = 1.11-2.05). The association between depression and mortality persists over long periods of time and has emerged among women in recent decades, despite contemporaneous improvements in the treatment of depression and reduction of stigma associated with depression. Further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms involved.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 46 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 2 29%
Unspecified 1 14%
Professor 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Other 1 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmaceutical Science 2 29%
Medicine and Dentistry 2 29%
Unspecified 1 14%
Psychology 1 14%
Social Sciences 1 14%
Other 0 0%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 403. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 07 December 2017.
All research outputs
#15,058
of 8,779,992 outputs
Outputs from Canadian Medical Association Journal
#26
of 4,835 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#917
of 234,224 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Canadian Medical Association Journal
#2
of 103 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 8,779,992 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 4,835 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 20.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,224 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 103 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 98% of its contemporaries.