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IL-17 signalling restructures the nasal microbiome and drives dynamic changes following Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization

Overview of attention for article published in BMC Genomics, October 2017
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4 tweeters

Citations

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2 Dimensions

Readers on

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27 Mendeley
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Title
IL-17 signalling restructures the nasal microbiome and drives dynamic changes following Streptococcus pneumoniae colonization
Published in
BMC Genomics, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s12864-017-4215-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Neil D. Ritchie, Umer Z. Ijaz, Tom J. Evans

Abstract

The bacterial pathogen Streptococcus pneumoniae colonizes the nasopharynx prior to causing disease, necessitating successful competition with the resident microflora. Cytokines of the IL-17 family are important in host defence against this pathogen but their effect on the nasopharyngeal microbiome is unknown. Here we analyse the influence of IL-17 on the composition and interactions of the nasopharyngeal microbiome before and after pneumococcal colonization. Using a murine model and 16S rRNA profiling, we found that a lack of IL-17 signalling led to profound alterations in the nasal but not lung microbiome characterized by decreased diversity and richness, increases in Proteobacteria and reduction in Bacteroidetes, Actinobacteria and Acidobacteria. Following experimental pneumococcal nasal inoculation, animals lacking IL-17 family signalling showed increased pneumococcal colonization, though both wild type and knockout animals showed as significant disruption of nasal microbiome composition, with increases in the proportion of Proteobacteria, even in animals that did not have persistent colonization. Sparse correlation analysis of the composition of the microbiome at various time points after infection showed strong positive interactions within the Firmicutes and Proteobacteria, but strong antagonism between members of these two phyla. These results show the powerful influence of IL-17 signalling on the composition of the nasal microbiome before and after pneumococcal colonization, and apparent lack of interspecific competition between pneumococci and other Firmicutes. IL-17 driven changes in nasal microbiome composition may thus be an important factor in successful resistance to pneumococcal colonization and potentially could be manipulated to augment host defence against this pathogen.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 4 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 27 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 27 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 33%
Researcher 4 15%
Student > Master 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Student > Postgraduate 2 7%
Other 3 11%
Unknown 5 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Immunology and Microbiology 6 22%
Medicine and Dentistry 5 19%
Chemistry 3 11%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 2 7%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 2 7%
Other 2 7%
Unknown 7 26%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 2. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 21 June 2018.
All research outputs
#7,903,972
of 13,116,247 outputs
Outputs from BMC Genomics
#4,452
of 7,729 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#165,102
of 310,766 outputs
Outputs of similar age from BMC Genomics
#450
of 821 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,116,247 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,729 research outputs from this source. They receive a mean Attention Score of 4.3. This one is in the 37th percentile – i.e., 37% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 310,766 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 821 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 40th percentile – i.e., 40% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.