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Antibiotic Resistance in Food-Borne Bacterial Contaminants in Vietnam

Overview of attention for article published in Applied and Environmental Microbiology, October 2007
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (63rd percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (51st percentile)

Mentioned by

policy
1 policy source

Citations

dimensions_citation
70 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
68 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
Antibiotic Resistance in Food-Borne Bacterial Contaminants in Vietnam
Published in
Applied and Environmental Microbiology, October 2007
DOI 10.1128/aem.00973-07
Pubmed ID
Authors

T. T. H. Van, G. Moutafis, L. T. Tran, P. J. Coloe

Abstract

This study was conducted to examine the rate of contamination and the molecular characteristics of enteric bacteria isolated from a selection of food sources in Vietnam. One hundred eighty raw food samples were tested; 60.8% of meat samples and 18.0% of shellfish samples were contaminated with Salmonella spp., and more than 90% of all food sources contained Escherichia coli. The isolates were screened for antibiotic resistance against 15 antibiotics, and 50.5% of Salmonella isolates and 83.8% of E. coli isolates were resistant to at least one antibiotic. Isolates were examined for the presence of mobile genetic elements conferring antibiotic resistance. Fifty-seven percent of E. coli and 13% of Salmonella isolates were found to contain integrons, and some isolates contained two integrons. Sequencing results revealed that the integrons harbored various gene cassettes, including aadA1, aadA2, and aadA5 (resistance to streptomycin and spectinomycin), aacA4 (resistance to aminoglycosides), the dihydrofolate reductase gene cassettes dhfrXII, dfrA1, and dhfrA17 (trimethoprim resistance), the beta-lactamase gene bla(PSE1) (ampicillin resistance), and catB3 (chloramphenicol resistance). Plasmids were also detected in all 23 antibiotic-resistant Salmonella isolates and in 33 E. coli isolates. Thirty-five percent of the Salmonella isolates and 76% of the E. coli isolates contained plasmids of more than 95 kb, and some of the isolates contained two large plasmids. Conjugation experiments showed the successful transfer of all or part of the antibiotic resistance phenotypes among the Salmonella and E. coli food isolates. Our results show that enteric bacteria in raw food samples from Vietnam contain a pool of mobile genetic elements and that the transfer of antibiotic resistance can readily occur between similar bacteria.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 68 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
India 1 1%
Chile 1 1%
Uzbekistan 1 1%
Japan 1 1%
United States 1 1%
Unknown 63 93%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 16 24%
Researcher 13 19%
Student > Master 10 15%
Unspecified 8 12%
Student > Bachelor 8 12%
Other 13 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 21 31%
Medicine and Dentistry 10 15%
Immunology and Microbiology 10 15%
Unspecified 9 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 10%
Other 11 16%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 01 January 2014.
All research outputs
#3,632,709
of 12,508,562 outputs
Outputs from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#3,656
of 9,509 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#110,064
of 311,936 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Applied and Environmental Microbiology
#85
of 178 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,508,562 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 49th percentile – i.e., 49% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 9,509 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.9. This one is in the 31st percentile – i.e., 31% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 311,936 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 63% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 178 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 51% of its contemporaries.