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Interplay of Socioeconomic Status and Supermarket Distance Is Associated with Excess Obesity Risk: A UK Cross-Sectional Study

Overview of attention for article published in International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (95th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (97th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
2 news outlets
twitter
57 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
googleplus
1 Google+ user

Citations

dimensions_citation
17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
59 Mendeley
Title
Interplay of Socioeconomic Status and Supermarket Distance Is Associated with Excess Obesity Risk: A UK Cross-Sectional Study
Published in
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, October 2017
DOI 10.3390/ijerph14111290
Pubmed ID
Authors

Thomas Burgoine, Joreintje Mackenbach, Jeroen Lakerveld, Nita Forouhi, Simon Griffin, Søren Brage, Nicholas Wareham, Pablo Monsivais

Abstract

U.S. policy initiatives have sought to improve health through attracting neighborhood supermarket investment. Little evidence exists to suggest that these policies will be effective, in particular where there are socioeconomic barriers to healthy eating. We measured the independent associations and combined interplay of supermarket access and socioeconomic status with obesity. Using data on 9702 UK adults, we employed adjusted regression analyses to estimate measured BMI (kg/m²), overweight (25 ≥ BMI < 30) and obesity (≥30), across participants' highest educational attainment (three groups) and tertiles of street network distance (km) from home location to nearest supermarket. Jointly-classified models estimated combined associations of education and supermarket distance, and relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). Participants farthest away from their nearest supermarket had higher odds of obesity (OR 1.33, 95% CI: 1.11, 1.58), relative to those living closest. Lower education was also associated with higher odds of obesity. Those least-educated and living farthest away had 3.39 (2.46-4.65) times the odds of being obese, compared to those highest-educated and living closest, with an excess obesity risk (RERI = 0.09); results were similar for overweight. Our results suggest that public health can be improved through planning better access to supermarkets, in combination with interventions to address socioeconomic barriers.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 57 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 59 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 59 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 17 29%
Unspecified 10 17%
Student > Ph. D. Student 10 17%
Student > Bachelor 6 10%
Student > Postgraduate 5 8%
Other 11 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Unspecified 16 27%
Medicine and Dentistry 11 19%
Social Sciences 10 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 5 8%
Psychology 4 7%
Other 13 22%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 57. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 October 2018.
All research outputs
#309,964
of 13,622,595 outputs
Outputs from International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
#197
of 6,604 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#13,964
of 314,787 outputs
Outputs of similar age from International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
#8
of 286 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,622,595 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 6,604 research outputs from this source. They typically receive more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 9.3. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 314,787 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 95% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 286 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.