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Microbial biodiversity assessment of the European Space Agency’s ExoMars 2016 mission

Overview of attention for article published in Microbiome, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (86th percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters

Citations

dimensions_citation
13 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
35 Mendeley
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Title
Microbial biodiversity assessment of the European Space Agency’s ExoMars 2016 mission
Published in
Microbiome, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40168-017-0358-3
Pubmed ID
Authors

Kaisa Koskinen, Petra Rettberg, Rüdiger Pukall, Anna Auerbach, Lisa Wink, Simon Barczyk, Alexandra Perras, Alexander Mahnert, Diana Margheritis, Gerhard Kminek, Christine Moissl-Eichinger

Abstract

The ExoMars 2016 mission, consisting of the Trace Gas Orbiter and the Schiaparelli lander, was launched on March 14 2016 from Baikonur, Kazakhstan and reached its destination in October 2016. The Schiaparelli lander was subject to strict requirements for microbial cleanliness according to the obligatory planetary protection policy. To reach the required cleanliness, the ExoMars 2016 flight hardware was assembled in a newly built, biocontrolled cleanroom complex at Thales Alenia Space in Turin, Italy. In this study, we performed microbiological surveys of the cleanroom facilities and the spacecraft hardware before and during the assembly, integration and testing (AIT) activities. Besides the European Space Agency (ESA) standard bioburden assay, that served as a proxy for the microbiological contamination in general, we performed various alternative cultivation assays and utilised molecular techniques, including quantitative PCR and next generation sequencing, to assess the absolute and relative abundance and broadest diversity of microorganisms and their signatures in the cleanroom and on the spacecraft hardware. Our results show that the bioburden, detected microbial contamination and microbial diversity decreased continuously after the cleanroom was decontaminated with more effective cleaning agents and during the ongoing AIT. The studied cleanrooms and change room were occupied by very distinct microbial communities: Overall, the change room harboured a higher number and diversity of microorganisms, including Propionibacterium, which was found to be significantly increased in the change room. In particular, the so called alternative cultivation assays proved important in detecting a broader cultivable diversity than covered by the standard bioburden assay and thus completed the picture on the cleanroom microbiota. During the whole project, the bioburden stayed at acceptable level and did not raise any concern for the ExoMars 2016 mission. The cleanroom complex at Thales Alenia Space in Turin is an excellent example of how efficient microbiological control is performed.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 35 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 35 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 9 26%
Researcher 6 17%
Student > Master 4 11%
Student > Doctoral Student 4 11%
Professor 3 9%
Other 4 11%
Unknown 5 14%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 7 20%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 6 17%
Immunology and Microbiology 4 11%
Earth and Planetary Sciences 3 9%
Engineering 2 6%
Other 5 14%
Unknown 8 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 15. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 14 June 2018.
All research outputs
#1,365,535
of 15,830,213 outputs
Outputs from Microbiome
#516
of 908 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#43,382
of 323,202 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Microbiome
#97
of 143 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,830,213 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 91st percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 908 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 39.2. This one is in the 42nd percentile – i.e., 42% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,202 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 86% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 143 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 32nd percentile – i.e., 32% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.