↓ Skip to main content

Evaluating anthropogenic threats to endangered killer whales to inform effective recovery plans

Overview of attention for article published in Scientific Reports, October 2017
Altmetric Badge

About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
19 news outlets
blogs
3 blogs
twitter
365 tweeters
facebook
9 Facebook pages
reddit
1 Redditor

Citations

dimensions_citation
7 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
94 Mendeley
Title
Evaluating anthropogenic threats to endangered killer whales to inform effective recovery plans
Published in
Scientific Reports, October 2017
DOI 10.1038/s41598-017-14471-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Robert C. Lacy, Rob Williams, Erin Ashe, Kenneth C. Balcomb III, Lauren J. N. Brent, Christopher W. Clark, Darren P. Croft, Deborah A. Giles, Misty MacDuffee, Paul C. Paquet

Abstract

Understanding cumulative effects of multiple threats is key to guiding effective management to conserve endangered species. The critically endangered, Southern Resident killer whale population of the northeastern Pacific Ocean provides a data-rich case to explore anthropogenic threats on population viability. Primary threats include: limitation of preferred prey, Chinook salmon; anthropogenic noise and disturbance, which reduce foraging efficiency; and high levels of stored contaminants, including PCBs. We constructed a population viability analysis to explore possible demographic trajectories and the relative importance of anthropogenic stressors. The population is fragile, with no growth projected under current conditions, and decline expected if new or increased threats are imposed. Improvements in fecundity and calf survival are needed to reach a conservation objective of 2.3% annual population growth. Prey limitation is the most important factor affecting population growth. However, to meet recovery targets through prey management alone, Chinook abundance would have to be sustained near the highest levels since the 1970s. The most optimistic mitigation of noise and contaminants would make the difference between a declining and increasing population, but would be insufficient to reach recovery targets. Reducing acoustic disturbance by 50% combined with increasing Chinook by 15% would allow the population to reach 2.3% growth.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 365 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 94 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 94 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 27 29%
Student > Bachelor 20 21%
Researcher 15 16%
Student > Ph. D. Student 12 13%
Unspecified 10 11%
Other 10 11%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 36 38%
Environmental Science 31 33%
Unspecified 12 13%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 4 4%
Social Sciences 3 3%
Other 8 9%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 439. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 17 July 2019.
All research outputs
#20,883
of 13,383,381 outputs
Outputs from Scientific Reports
#310
of 64,796 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#1,111
of 312,137 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Scientific Reports
#61
of 13,059 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 13,383,381 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 64,796 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.6. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 312,137 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 13,059 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.