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Autistic empathy toward autistic others

Overview of attention for article published in Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, October 2014
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (97th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (93rd percentile)

Mentioned by

twitter
88 tweeters
facebook
3 Facebook pages

Citations

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17 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
120 Mendeley
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Title
Autistic empathy toward autistic others
Published in
Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience, October 2014
DOI 10.1093/scan/nsu126
Pubmed ID
Authors

Hidetsugu Komeda, Hirotaka Kosaka, Daisuke N. Saito, Yoko Mano, Minyoung Jung, Takeshi Fujii, Hisakazu T. Yanaka, Toshio Munesue, Makoto Ishitobi, Makoto Sato, Hidehiko Okazawa

Abstract

Individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are thought to lack self-awareness and to experience difficulty empathizing with others. Although these deficits have been demonstrated in previous studies, most of the target stimuli were constructed for typically developing (TD) individuals. We employed judgment tasks capable of indexing self-relevant processing in individuals with and without ASD. Fourteen Japanese men and 1 Japanese women with high-functioning ASD (17-41 years of age) and 13 Japanese men and 2 TD Japanese women (22-40 years of age), all of whom were matched for age and full and verbal intelligence quotient scores with the ASD participants, were enrolled in this study. The results demonstrated that the ventromedial prefrontal cortex was significantly activated in individuals with ASD in response to autistic characters and in TD individuals in response to non-autistic characters. Although the frontal-posterior network between the ventromedial prefrontal cortex and superior temporal gyrus participated in the processing of non-autistic characters in TD individuals, an alternative network was involved when individuals with ASD processed autistic characters. This suggests an atypical form of empathy in individuals with ASD toward others with ASD.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 88 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 120 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Netherlands 2 2%
Japan 1 <1%
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Unknown 116 97%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 20%
Researcher 18 15%
Student > Bachelor 17 14%
Student > Master 10 8%
Professor > Associate Professor 8 7%
Other 20 17%
Unknown 23 19%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Psychology 40 33%
Medicine and Dentistry 15 13%
Neuroscience 15 13%
Social Sciences 4 3%
Engineering 3 3%
Other 11 9%
Unknown 32 27%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 58. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 26 September 2020.
All research outputs
#418,672
of 16,652,557 outputs
Outputs from Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience
#128
of 1,574 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#6,570
of 234,856 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Social Cognitive & Affective Neuroscience
#6
of 75 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,652,557 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 97th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 1,574 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 21.9. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 91% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,856 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 97% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 75 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 93% of its contemporaries.