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The effects of iron fortification and supplementation on the gut microbiome and diarrhea in infants and children: a review

Overview of attention for article published in American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 25% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (85th percentile)
  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (59th percentile)

Mentioned by

blogs
1 blog
twitter
15 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
60 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
182 Mendeley
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Title
The effects of iron fortification and supplementation on the gut microbiome and diarrhea in infants and children: a review
Published in
American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, October 2017
DOI 10.3945/ajcn.117.156067
Pubmed ID
Authors

Daniela Paganini, Michael B Zimmermann

Abstract

In infants and young children in Sub-Saharan Africa, iron-deficiency anemia (IDA) is common, and many complementary foods are low in bioavailable iron. In-home fortification of complementary foods using iron-containing micronutrient powders (MNPs) and oral iron supplementation are both effective strategies to increase iron intakes and reduce IDA at this age. However, these interventions produce large increases in colonic iron because the absorption of their high iron dose (≥12.5 mg) is typically <20%. We reviewed studies in infants and young children on the effects of iron supplements and iron fortification with MNPs on the gut microbiome and diarrhea. Iron-containing MNPs and iron supplements can modestly increase diarrhea risk, and in vitro and in vivo studies have suggested that this occurs because increases in colonic iron adversely affect the gut microbiome in that they decrease abundances of beneficial barrier commensal gut bacteria (e.g., bifidobacteria and lactobacilli) and increase the abundance of enterobacteria including entropathogenic Escherichia coli These changes are associated with increased gut inflammation. Therefore, safer formulations of iron-containing supplements and MNPs are needed. To improve MNP safety, the iron dose of these formulations should be reduced while maximizing absorption to retain efficacy. Also, the addition of prebiotics to MNPs is a promising approach to mitigate the adverse effects of iron on the infant gut.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 15 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 182 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 182 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 37 20%
Researcher 25 14%
Student > Ph. D. Student 24 13%
Student > Bachelor 22 12%
Other 10 5%
Other 31 17%
Unknown 33 18%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Nursing and Health Professions 33 18%
Medicine and Dentistry 30 16%
Agricultural and Biological Sciences 25 14%
Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology 20 11%
Social Sciences 7 4%
Other 25 14%
Unknown 42 23%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 14. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 10 December 2018.
All research outputs
#1,448,448
of 15,830,213 outputs
Outputs from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#2,820
of 11,630 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#45,715
of 323,100 outputs
Outputs of similar age from American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
#29
of 71 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 15,830,213 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 90th percentile: it's in the top 10% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 11,630 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 24.9. This one has done well, scoring higher than 75% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 323,100 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done well, scoring higher than 85% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 71 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 59% of its contemporaries.