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Post-graduate medical education in public health: the case of Italy and a call for action

Overview of attention for article published in Public Health Reviews, October 2017
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About this Attention Score

  • Above-average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (62nd percentile)
  • Average Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source

Mentioned by

twitter
3 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page

Citations

dimensions_citation
4 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
7 Mendeley
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Title
Post-graduate medical education in public health: the case of Italy and a call for action
Published in
Public Health Reviews, October 2017
DOI 10.1186/s40985-017-0069-0
Pubmed ID
Authors

Anna Odone, Gaetano Pierpaolo Privitera, Carlo Signorelli

Abstract

Public health technical expertise is of crucial importance to inform decision makers' action in the field of health and its broader determinants. Improving education and training of public health professionals for both practice and research is the starting point to strengthen the role of public health so that current health challenges can be efficiently tackled. At the Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region (ASPHER) Deans' & Directors' 2017 Annual Retreat, we presented the structure and management of public health training system in Italy, and we reported recent data on Italian public health specialists' educational experience, employment opportunities and job satisfaction. Public health training in Italy is implemented in the context of the post-graduate medical education residency programme in Hygiene and Preventive Medicine, delivered by 34 University-based Schools of Public Health. We report relatively high employment rates across the county and wide spectrum of career opportunities for young public health specialists. However, job security is low and training expectations only partially met. We call upon other Schools of Public Health to scale up the survey within the broad ASPHER community in a shared and coordinated action of systematically collecting useful data that can inform the development of public health education and training models, their implementation and fruitful interaction with population health, health systems and services.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 3 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 7 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
Unknown 7 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Master 3 43%
Student > Bachelor 1 14%
Lecturer 1 14%
Student > Postgraduate 1 14%
Researcher 1 14%
Other 0 0%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 4 57%
Unspecified 2 29%
Mathematics 1 14%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 3. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 15 January 2018.
All research outputs
#6,326,013
of 12,368,793 outputs
Outputs from Public Health Reviews
#90
of 129 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#109,170
of 294,165 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Public Health Reviews
#9
of 14 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 12,368,793 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 48th percentile – i.e., 48% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 129 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 15.5. This one is in the 29th percentile – i.e., 29% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 294,165 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has gotten more attention than average, scoring higher than 62% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 14 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 35th percentile – i.e., 35% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.