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SARS Control and Psychological Effects of Quarantine, Toronto, Canada

Overview of attention for article published in Emerging Infectious Diseases, July 2004
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About this Attention Score

  • In the top 5% of all research outputs scored by Altmetric
  • Among the highest-scoring outputs from this source (#21 of 7,654)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age (99th percentile)
  • High Attention Score compared to outputs of the same age and source (99th percentile)

Mentioned by

news
169 news outlets
blogs
17 blogs
policy
4 policy sources
twitter
159 tweeters
facebook
1 Facebook page
wikipedia
1 Wikipedia page

Citations

dimensions_citation
369 Dimensions

Readers on

mendeley
912 Mendeley
citeulike
1 CiteULike
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Title
SARS Control and Psychological Effects of Quarantine, Toronto, Canada
Published in
Emerging Infectious Diseases, July 2004
DOI 10.3201/eid1007.030703
Pubmed ID
Authors

Laura Hawryluck, Wayne L. Gold, Susan Robinson, Stephen Pogorski, Sandro Galea, Rima Styra

Abstract

As a transmissible infectious disease, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) was successfully contained globally by instituting widespread quarantine measures. Although these measures were successful in terminating the outbreak in all areas of the world, the adverse effects of quarantine have not previously been determined in a systematic manner. In this hypothesis-generating study supported by a convenience sample drawn in close temporal proximity to the period of quarantine, we examined the psychological effects of quarantine on persons in Toronto, Canada. The 129 quarantined persons who responded to a Web-based survey exhibited a high prevalence of psychological distress. Symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression were observed in 28.9% and 31.2% of respondents, respectively. Longer durations of quarantine were associated with an increased prevalence of PTSD symptoms. Acquaintance with or direct exposure to someone with a diagnosis of SARS was also associated with PTSD and depressive symptoms.

Twitter Demographics

The data shown below were collected from the profiles of 159 tweeters who shared this research output. Click here to find out more about how the information was compiled.

Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 912 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United States 2 <1%
Germany 1 <1%
Unknown 909 100%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Bachelor 154 17%
Researcher 124 14%
Student > Master 120 13%
Student > Ph. D. Student 76 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 55 6%
Other 188 21%
Unknown 195 21%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Medicine and Dentistry 191 21%
Psychology 159 17%
Nursing and Health Professions 53 6%
Social Sciences 51 6%
Neuroscience 30 3%
Other 166 18%
Unknown 262 29%

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1587. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 25 October 2020.
All research outputs
#2,726
of 16,094,275 outputs
Outputs from Emerging Infectious Diseases
#21
of 7,654 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#26
of 234,447 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Emerging Infectious Diseases
#1
of 139 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 16,094,275 research outputs across all sources so far. Compared to these this one has done particularly well and is in the 99th percentile: it's in the top 5% of all research outputs ever tracked by Altmetric.
So far Altmetric has tracked 7,654 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a lot more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 36.1. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its peers.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 234,447 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.
We're also able to compare this research output to 139 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one has done particularly well, scoring higher than 99% of its contemporaries.